— A new state law backed by AARP Kansas will help ease the transition from hospital to home for patients and their caregivers, beginning next year. The Kansas Lay Caregiver Act, also called the CARE Act, will allow every hospital patient to designate a caregiver. Hospital staff will record the caregiver’s contact information and keep that person informed about discharge plans. In addition, the hospital will prepare the caregiver for follow-up medical tasks to be done at home. About 345,000 Kansans …

—   Kansas ranks 30th when it comes to meeting the long-term care needs of older residents and people with disabilities, and AARP warns more must be done, at an accelerated pace, to meet changing demographic demands. Specific areas of concern in Kansas include support for family caregivers and more effective transitions from nursing homes to home. This, according to a new, comprehensive state-by-state Scorecard from AARP with support of the nation’s leading organizations behind quality long-term care, The Commonwealth Fund …

—   Great news for our state’s more than 345,000 caregivers and the people for whom they provide care. The Kansas Legislature has passed and Governor Brownback has signed the Kansas Lay Caregivers Act, otherwise known as the Caregiver, Advise, Record and Enable or CARE Act. The new law, which goes into effect on July 1, 2018, will support caregivers when the person they are caring for is hospitalized and then returns home and is in need of care. AARP volunteers …

— With Governor Brownback’s veto of KanCare (the Kansas version of Medicaid) expansion, House Bill 2044, the Kansas House now has the opportunity to put hardworking Kansans first and overturn the governor’s veto. Maren Turner, director of AARP Kansas—with more than 320,000 members age 50 and older in the Sunflower State—issued the following statement, urging the House to take action now. “Hardworking Kansans are counting on their elected State Representatives to override Gov. Brownback’s veto and expand KanCare—bringing access to affordable …

— On February 23, the Kansas Senate voted 38-1 in favor of the Kansas Lay Caregivers Act (SB 68 as amended), otherwise known as the CARE Act.  The CARE Act would require Kansas hospitals to give each patient the opportunity to designate a caregiver when they enter the hospital so the caregiver’s name can be recorded, the caregiver is informed when the patient is transferred or about to be discharged, and the caregiver is given instruction on how to take care …

—   At AARP, we believe Medicare is a deal with the American people that must not be broken. Thankfully, President Trump repeatedly said during his historic campaign that he would not allow changes to this popular program.  “I am going to protect and save your Social Security and your Medicare,” he told voters. “You made a deal a long time ago. “ Older voters were instrumental in electing President Trump and the Republican Congress. Now those voters are counting on …

— On February 1, 2017, the Senate Public Health and Welfare Committee, chaired by Senator Vicki Schmidt, heard testimony on Senate Bill 68, the CARE Act. This proposed legislation would support the 345,000 Kansas caregivers who are providing unpaid care to a family member or loved one.  The CARE Act, (Caregiver, Advise, Record, Enable Act) is another tool to reduce unnecessary hospitalizations by ensuring that caregivers are acknowledged and instructed on how to care for their loved one when he/she returns …

— Kansas lawmakers, many of them new to the Statehouse as a result of the 2016 elections, will began their work in Topeka this week. You can be sure that AARP Kansas volunteers and staff will also be at the State Capitol working hard to educate legislators, both new and returning, about issues that impact those who are 50 and older. Chief among the many issues is passage of the Caregiver, Advise, Record, Enable (CARE) Act, legislation that would help support …

—     What could have been a $4.54 per month rate increase, was reduced to a $1.25 a month increase for Kansas Gas Service customers as a result of a settlement agreement approved by the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) in November. At the urging of AARP Kansas, hundreds of Kansans contacted the KCC to ask the commission not to approve the higher increase. The company had asked for a $35.4 million base rate increase, but instead received a $15.5 million …

— AARP Kansas is pressing state lawmakers to introduce a bill in 2017 that could help more private-sector workers save for retirement. The proposal, called “work and save,” would create a payroll-deduction plan that small businesses could offer to their workers. Participation would be voluntary for both employers and employees, and the plan would be portable when a worker changes jobs. AARP is asking Kansans to share their personal stories about efforts to save for retirement without having a 401(k) or …