— The following fraud alert was issued by the New Hampshire Attorney General this morning and is reproduced below, with permission: Attorney General Gordon J. MacDonald and Director Elizabeth Bieleki, New Hampshire Division of Motor Vehicles, have issued a fraud alert warning of a scam email pretending to come from the New Hampshire Department of Motor Vehicles.  The fake email notifies the recipient that he or she was cited with a traffic violation and then demands payment of the fine within …

—   Equifax, one of the nation’s three major credit bureaus, recently announced that a data breach likely compromised the information of approximately 143 million Americans.  The media swirl that ensured has left many people confused and alarmed. What You Should Know As a credit-reporting agency, Equifax collects information about consumers and how we handle our financial obligations. Equifax and other credit bureaus sell this information to lenders and credit-scoring companies to determine our eligibility for loans and lines of credit, …

— It’s better late than never to prepare for retirement. Whether you’re still working, retired, or preparing for that encore career, AARP’s Take Charge of Your Financial Future Series will offer you real advice on when to claim Social Security, how to protect and grow your investments, and how to stay safe from frauds and scams. Bring a spouse, partner, or friend and join us for three different interactive 90-minute programs.  Register for one, two or all three!  (You do not …

— Every day hundreds of local residents lose their hard-earned money to a variety of fraud schemes. In fact, every 2 seconds, a con artist steals someone’s identity! To strike back against scammers, AARP Vermont and AARP New Hampshire are bringing together top experts and law enforcement officials from both states to present at a free informational Scam Jam in Fairlee, Vermont, at the Lake Morey Resort. Slated for September 19, the Vermont and New Hampshire Attorneys General will kick off …

— Learn simple steps to increase your online security Are you an easy target for online hackers or scammers? By learning some simple steps to secure your phone, increase your online safety and recognize scams, you reduce your risk of becoming the next victim. That’s why it’s a smart move to attend AARP’s Online Safety Workshop. In this live, one-hour online event, you’ll be guided by your workshop host as you learn the latest in online safety. You’ll also learn about …

— Using public Wi-Fi puts you at risk of sharing personal information with criminals. If you’re on free public Wi-Fi at the gym, a hotel or a coffee shop, anyone else on that same network can tap into the information you’re transferring over the network. This means any bad guy can see what you’re doing, leaving passwords, usernames, and account numbers vulnerable. Stick to browsing the web and checking news when on public Wi-Fi. Avoid online banking, checking email, making credit …

— We are in prime time for home repair scams. A common tactic is a “contractor” will come to your door and offer to do work on your home at a steep discount. He or she will likely demand payment upfront and then disappear. Or they will do the work but it will be shoddy, or they will demand more money to finish the job. Avoid working with contractors who contact you. Before you start any work, ask for references and …

— Caller ID spoofing is making its way to phones near you! Scammers have mastered calling people using a fake name and number that will pop up on your phone. The call will seem urgent.  It could concern something like an account that is about to be cancelled unless you immediately give your bank information or credit card number for payment. Never give out personal information via an incoming phone call.  You never know who is actually on the line. Be …

— If you have a sign for a home security system in your yard, be wary of this summer scam. Fraudsters will hire college students to walk through neighborhoods looking for houses with security system signs. The student will tell the homeowner the security company is going out of business, and the student’s “company” is taking over the account. The homeowner is told she has to buy new equipment and sign a new contract. Only the equipment is fake and the …

— Scammers are creating fake websites that look like known and trusted news sites to sell “brain booster” pills. They post bogus articles about the pills with endorsements from people like Stephen Hawking and Anderson Cooper (neither has endorsed any such product). The site then links you to the sales page for the pills where you can place an order with a credit or debit card. The scammers claim the pills will lead to an increase in concentration and memory recall, …