— Did you know 4th graders who can’t read at grade-level are four times less likely to graduate from high school? AARP Foundation Experience Corps is an intergenerational volunteer-based tutoring program that is proven to help children who aren’t reading at grade level become great readers by the end of third grade. Experience Corps has nearly 2,000 highly-trained volunteers working in 21 cities and serves over 30,000 students every year in high-need elementary schools. Each AARP Foundation Experience Corps site operates …

— AARP volunteers will kick off the first NeighborWalks program in Lane County this month. NeighborWalks is a collaborative community walking program created by AARP Oregon. SmartTrips Eugene, Safe Routes to School and the Lane Transportation District’s Point-to-Point program are working together with AARP to bring the program to Lane County. “Our vision is to get more people walking every day for health, environment and community,” said Michele Scheib, a member of  the AARP Oregon Executive Council and local volunteer. Walks will take place …

— By Mac McLean Juanita Santana knew exactly what came next when she retired from her job as director of a Head Start program in San Francisco. She moved to Portland in 2010 and became a full-time caregiver for her parents. That took up so much time that she never thought about what life would be like after they died, which happened a few years later. “It was real difficult for me to find my niche in retirement,” said Santana, 66. …

— Por Mac McLean Juanita Santana sabía exactamente lo que iba a hacer después de jubilarse como directora de un programa Head Start en San Francisco. En el 2010 se mudó a Portland y se dedicó a cuidar a sus padres a tiempo completo. Lo hizo durante tanto tiempo que nunca pensó acerca de cómo sería su vida después de que ellos fallecieran, lo cual sucedió unos años después. “Me fue realmente difícil encontrar algo que hacer al no tener que …

— From her glass-walled conference room perch, Carla Kelley has the world at her feet—well, at least Portland.  Portland, where she came for love, found that her true love was Portland itself.  Now in the position of Senior Counsel at a major Portland law firm, Carla actually retired from full-time employment several years ago.  But her experience and skills made her an attractive candidate to work in the firm’s business group.  She now works part-time and, at age 71, is a …

— In five years as an Oregon Long Term Care Ombudsman volunteer, I’ve seen a lot, sometimes inspiring, occasionally appalling. We are free, confidential advocates for the rights, dignity, and quality of life of adults in licensed nursing, residential care, assisted living, and adult foster care homes, where we visit, get to know residents, investigate complaints, watch and listen for problems and, with the resident’s approval, work to resolve them.   An elderly woman with diabetes might keep receiving her insulin …

— Sometimes when we’re in the community, we’ll hear from someone who says, “I’ve never met a real person from AARP!” Yes, there is an AARP Oregon State Office with a staff of 7 plus a great team of volunteer partners. We’re active on issues that matter to you and your family. In this season of gratitude and reflection, we want to share with you some of the highlights from our work this year. Engaged presidential and congressional candidates to “Take …

— Veterans Day is a good time to remind our friends and family who served their country in the military that veterans are a special target for some kinds of frauds and cons warns AARP Oregon. In the “how low can you go” category, scammers often target veterans — either in direct scams offering bogus services, or in charity scams that closely mimic the names of legitimate organizations helping veterans and military families. Warn your loved ones of these top tricks: …

— By Dick Weinman, AARP Volunteer and Assisted Living Guru (Editor’s Note: This is a bi-monthly column and what you learn about assisted living might surprise you!) 2005 sucked. At its beginning, in January, I committed my wife, Ginny, to Lydia’s House, an Alzheimer’s facility. I had been her caregiver in our home for seven years.  As is often the case with home caregivers, the experience made me an emotional wreck. I had never been a pill taker; now I was …

—   This is the first in a new series of blogs by the Oregon State Volunteer President Two months after my father’s death, I responded to an article in the AARP Bulletin seeking new volunteers in Oregon. To be honest, I knew more about the organization’s advertisements than its policies. My situation had not been unlike many baby boomers–I was working full time while carrying out the responsibilities of a devoted daughter. As my father’s Power of Attorney, my heart …