— What should the future of Seattle look like? How can we make the city a place where people of all ages can be healthy, independent and part of a vibrant community? (SEATTLE, WA) – On Tuesday, October 10, mayoral candidates Jenny Durkan and Cary Moon will share their views on issues like safe, walkable streets, better housing and transportation options, and opportunities for residents to connect and engage in the community life of our city no matter their age. The debate will be …

— AARP Funds Age-Friendly Hackathon to Make Communities More Livable [SEATTLE, WA] —AARP Washington announces the City of Seattle, in partnership with Sound Generations, has been selected to receive a grant from the AARP Community Challenge for their hackathon dubbed A City for All. “Making Seattle the leader among Age Friendly cities is a primary goal of mine,” Councilmember Sally Bagshaw said in a statement. “This hackathon will bring together our tech savvy community, as well as those of us who …

— Over 100,000 people in Washington state live with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias, and that number continues to grow. For many people with memory loss, social stigma and barriers to inclusion can lead to shame, fear, and isolation. However, it doesn’t have to be this way. We recognize that people with memory loss are a vital part of our communities, retain remarkable strengths and stories, and deserve the right to fully participate. Here in Washington state, we’re joining the worldwide …

— The Seattle Department of Transportation and AARP have launched a new public service campaign that highlights safety tips for people driving and walking. The campaign is part of Seattle’s Vision Zero plan to end traffic deaths and serious injuries by 2030. The campaign’s timing coincides with the increased potential for collisions during the darker and wetter months of fall and winter. Seattle is aggressively working to reduce serious and fatal collisions in Seattle through better and smarter street design (engineering), paired with targeted education and …

— By Dana E. Neuts This summer, Seattle became the 104th locality in the nation to be part of the AARP Network of Age-Friendly Communities. The designation reflects the city’s shifting demographics and renewed commitment to the needs of older residents. “This is a city that’s changing and has an influx of young folks, but it is also a city that continues to have an influx of people like myself who are aging,” said Mayor Ed Murray, 61. “It’s exciting to …

— AARP NEWS For Immediate Release August 31, 2016 Contacts: Jason Erskine, AARP / 206-517-9345 Katherine Bush Jolly, Seattle Human Services Dept. / 206-684-0253 Seattle Welcomed into the AARP Network of Age-Friendly Communities Seattle – AARP announced today that Seattle has been officially designated as part of the AARP Network of Age Friendly Communities.  As the 104th community in the U.S. to sign on to the network, Seattle’s civic leaders will have access to global resources and information on age-friendly best …

— By Dana E. Neuts Theresa Stringer, 75, and her husband, Edward, 80, of Forks, have been taking the Dungeness Line from Port Angeles to Seattle for doctors’ appointments for 10 years. Edward, an amputee with Parkinson’s disease, uses a wheelchair, but with the help of trained drivers and a lift-equipped bus, he is able to make the three-hour trip to Seattle safely. Because the Stringers no longer drive, the Dungeness Line is a convenient, affordable way to travel. Instead of …

— AARP Washington and more than 40 other advocacy and community service services organizations that advocate and serve thousands of older adults in King County and the State of Washington are deeply concerned that United Way’s new funding priorities will no longer include investments in programs that serve older adults and people with disabilities. United Way has traditionally played an “umbrella” role for human services in King County. Older adults have always been part of that umbrella for the past 50 …

— When former music teacher Pat Gray decided to retire, she imagined a life of leisure.  Instead, Pat heard a different calling from her local community in Kent and it resulted in a Life Reimagined. Pat started KentHOPE, a day shelter for homeless women and their children. The facility hosts an average of 30 women and children each day and offers three substantial meals a day, showers, laundry facilities, clothing, computers with internet access, health care, life skills classes, advocacy and hope. “It’s a thing I …