— If you missed “What’s on Your Mind” on Friday, May 26, you missed hearing David Certner, AARP’s Legislative Policy Director, discuss the impact the American Health Care Act would have on North Dakotans 50 and older. Here is David’s interview with Scott Hennen. Take a listen and learn how the bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives will affect you and the cost of insurance.

— May 24, 2017 – In keeping with its long history of fighting for affordable health care for people 50 and older, AARP is launching a  national campaign to make sure that any new health care legislation stops insurance companies from overcharging older Americans, lowers prescription drug prices, protects seniors’ ability to live independently and protects Medicare. AARP today announced new television ads against the Age Tax and other provisions in the health care bill, urging Senators to “vote No” on the …

— The American Health Care Act, which narrowly passed the U.S. House of Representatives on May 4 and is awaiting action by the U.S. Senate,  would make health care unaffordable and inaccessible for millions of Americans—including hundreds of thousands of Arkansans. The AHCA is very bad medicine for Arkansans, especially those ages 50 to 64. It would: X Remove protections for people with pre-existing health conditions, impacting over 280,000 Arkansans. X Weaken protections for people in the individual market and those …

— By Doug Dickerson, State Director, AARP North Carolina Few eyes are on Medicare, the healthcare plan that workers have paid into straight from their paychecks for almost 53 years.  Workers know that if there’s one thing that’s certain, is that healthcare is guaranteed if a person, regardless of their condition, can live to at least age 65.  Now, while the country’s attention is distracted with the President’s political troubles, conservative Congressional leaders are moving towards implementing a plan to drastically …

— The U.S. House of Representatives on Thursday,  May 4, 2017,  passed the dangerous American Health Care Act by a razor-thin margin: 217-213. This bill gives billions to special interests while sticking ordinary Americans with huge premium hikes. It includes an “age tax” that would force Americans age 50 to 64 to pay up to $13,000 more for health care. It weakens Medicare, and it removes protections for people with pre-existing conditions. The House should not have passed it. How did …

— WASHINGTON, DC — AARP Executive Vice President Nancy LeaMond reiterated AARP’s opposition to the health bill passed in the U.S. House of Representatives that would harm American families who count on access to affordable health care:  “AARP is deeply disappointed in today’s vote by the House to pass this deeply flawed health bill. The bill will put an Age Tax on us as we age, harming millions of American families  with health insurance, forcing many to lose coverage or pay …

— As you may have heard, Congress is quietly trying to revive its failed health care bill – and it’s getting worse than before. They’re cutting deals to let the big insurance companies charge you even more. It starts with an age tax. If you’re 50 or older, they can charge you five times more than everyone else. Up to $13,000 more per year. At AARP, the battle against the age tax and other provisions in a health care bill continues …

US Capitol

— In the short span of just three weeks, AARP Florida volunteers’ combined efforts helped defeat a plan in the U.S. Congress that would have weakened Medicare and cost older Americans thousands more every year, AARP’s Florida state director, Jeff Johnson, said. Since the introduction of the American Health Care Act, AARP Florida volunteers made phone calls, wrote letters, utilized social media and made videos to let congressional leaders know that they won’t be taken advantage of, said Johnson. “You stood …

— STATEMENT OF AARP CALIFORNIA STATE DIRECTOR NANCY MCPHERSON: On behalf of AARP’s nearly 3.3 million California members, I want to thank the members of California’s Republican and Democratic Congressional delegations for their leadership in taking a stand to oppose the American Health Care Act. While it’s true that health care costs are continuing to rise, the AHCA would have actually increased prices further, while providing less coverage and giving billions of dollars in tax breaks to pharmaceutical and insurance companies. …

— AARP applauds the withdrawal of the American Health Care Act. It would’ve been a boon for special interests, not a plan to improve care for Coloradans. The decision to pull the bill from consideration on March 24 in the U.S. House of Representatives shows Americans have the ability to make themselves heard. That bill would have added an “age tax” on older Americans and put vulnerable populations — including tens of thousands of Hispanics — at risk. The “age tax” would have cost older consumers thousands of dollars a …