— By Dr. Smita Patel Proton pump inhibitors or “PPIs” are a class of drugs that treat acid reflux and peptic ulcers. The three most commonly prescribed PPIs are omeprazole, pantoprazole and esomeprazole. In recent years, some studies reported that PPIs increase risk for dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. We hear patients asking questions about this issue, so I’d like to clarify what we currently know about this risk. A number of large-scale observational studies have found that people taking PPIs long-term …

— Strategies for improving brain health, coping with dementia and what to do when a loved one is hospitalized are part of a free workshop for caregivers at Catholic Charities Hawaii on June 24. “Caring for family is a tough job and education and training is a way to ease the stress of caregiving. It’s part of our missions for AARP Hawaii and our partners at Catholic Charities Hawaii to help caregivers,” said Barbara Kim Stanton, state director for AARP Hawaii. …

— If you are one of an estimated 837,000 Hoosiers who provide unpaid care for a family member or friend—or expect to be a caregiver in the future—AARP Indiana invites you to Caregiving Night on Thursday, June 22, at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis. Experts will answer questions about elder law, dementia, Adult Protective Services, Area Agencies on Aging, resources for caregivers, compassion fatigue and self-care. To provide some fun as well, the event will include a trivia contest, drinks, hors …

— The Alzheimer’s Association Oregon Chapter will host its first Healthy Brain Symposium in Tualatin on Monday, June 26, from 5 to 9 p.m. The event aims to raise awareness of signs for early detection and to highlight the role of healthy lifestyles in reducing the risk of cognitive decline. About 63,000 people 65 and older are living with dementia in Oregon, a number projected to grow to 84,000 by 2025. AARP members are invited to attend the symposium at the …

— Former television news anchor Diane Ako writes about her life as a mother, wife and caregiver to her mother, who is in the final stages of Alzheimer’s, in her “Peace of Mind” blog This was the first year Mother’s Day was hard for me, and this feeling takes me by surprise. When I go to see her, I’m usually chirpy and full of updates – which will never be understood but make me feel better to put out there. This year, …

— Over 100,000 people in Washington state live with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias, and that number continues to grow. For many people with memory loss, social stigma and barriers to inclusion can lead to shame, fear, and isolation. However, it doesn’t have to be this way. We recognize that people with memory loss are a vital part of our communities, retain remarkable strengths and stories, and deserve the right to fully participate. Here in Washington state, we’re joining the worldwide …

— Dear Readers, We recently partnered with AARP Illinois to organize an event for members to learn about dementia prevention and brain health. The program was a big success.  And, we’d like to give a big thanks to the AARP and its members who attended. We have gathered the questions from audience members and over the next few months would like to take the opportunity to answer them here in this blog. Question: What is the difference between Alzheimer’s and dementia? …

— Women may face yet another disadvantage when it comes to early detection of Alzheimer’s disease. One in five women will get Alzheimer’s disease in their lifetime.  For men, it’s one in ten.  Understanding this difference in gender and Alzheimer’s disease is the subject of much research and debate.  Some theories include the loss of protective estrogen after menopause and the simple fact that women, in general, live longer. A recent study out of the University of Illinois Center for Research …

— Every 60 seconds, someone in the U.S. develops dementia. As adult children reunite with their aging parents during the holidays, they often notice worrying signs that their elders’ memories are failing. When does forgetfulness signal something more? What are the early warning signs of dementia? What’s the best way to initiate a conversation with a loved one who seems increasingly forgetful? For answers to those questions, call the 9News 9Line — 303-698-0999 between 4 to 5:30 p.m. on Dec. 12. …

— “The end of Alzheimer’s starts with me.” That’s the slogan for the Phoenix Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Cosponsored by AARP Arizona, the Banner Alzheimer’s Institute and Dignity Health, the event is Saturday, Nov. 12. About 12,000 people are expected to participate on behalf of more than 120,000 Arizonans with dementia. Many families walk in teams, often representing three or four generations in support or memory of a loved one. Participants can choose between a one-mile route or a three-mile route. …