— AARP members are invited to join us for coffee and conversation when we are in your neighborhood. The locations we plan to be at before the end of the year are listed below. We’ll spend just a few minutes talking about our work to support family caregivers in North Dakota, health care, and some of our other initiatives. Then, we’d like to hear what’s on your mind. Please join an AARP North Dakota Executive Council member and a member of …

— AARP Maine is hitting the road to talk about what’s been on everyone’s minds: health care. Funded by a grant from Maine Health Access Foundation (MeHAF), AARP Maine is holding a series of community forums throughout the state (please see our schedule, below).   During these open discussions, we hope you will share with us your concerns as well as your ideas on these sometimes complicated issues. Each forum features a panel of local experts including hospital administrators, physicians, public …

— By Tamara Lytle Virginia voters will choose this fall between candidates for governor who differ on taxes, health care and jobs. Republican Ed Gillespie, 56, chaired the Republican National Committee, was a White House counselor to George W. Bush and, more recently, worked as a lobbyist and political consultant. He lives in southern Fairfax County. Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, who turns 58 this month, is the Democratic nominee in the Nov. 7 election. He is a pediatric neurologist and an …

— By David Lewellen On May 5, state Sen. Fred Risser turned 90. Three weeks later, he took a 90-mile bike ride to celebrate—no cameras, no riding companions, just him going at his own pace. Riding one mile for every year has become a tradition for him. “It takes a little longer every year,” he said. Serving in the Wisconsin Legislature has been an even longer ride. Risser was reelected in November, without opposition, to his 14th four-year Senate term. Add …

— By Danica Lucker Shirley Leow’s experience as a former pharmaceutical researcher and biotech executive comes in handy when she advocates before the state General Assembly for affordable health care and keeping rural hospitals alive. “I earned a decent living, which provided for my retirement, but that’s not the case for many people,” Leow said. “I have many female friends, for example, who are widows and are struggling. That’s why I got involved with AARP.” Leow, 65, of Lakewood, leads AARP …

— Welcome to Fall!  A message from AARP Maine State Director, Lori Parham:   Can it already by autumn?  If you are like me, you are wondering where the time has gone as we head into one of the most beautiful seasons of the year. AARP Maine staff and volunteers have been hard at work all summer, particularly on health care as we followed the Senate and the roller-coaster ride of health care bills and votes.  I want to acknowledge those …

— More and more patients are hearing the words “regenerative medicine” but don’t know what it means in terms of their care. And billboards and advertisements are popping up for stem cell therapy, but there are still misconceptions about it and how it works. As a primary care sports medicine physician who uses this innovative therapy for musculoskeletal issues, such as torn ligaments, tendons, strains and arthritis, I’m pleased to answer some common questions about regenerative medicine: How do Intense workouts …

— AARP Maine thanks U.S. Senators Susan Collins and Angus King for standing strong for Maine and voting NO! WASHINGTON, DC—Reacting to today’s defeat of the Senate’s ‘skinny’ repeal bill, AARP Executive Vice President Nancy LeaMond released the following statement: “Today’s vote is a victory for Americans age 50-plus.  The ‘skinny’ bill the Senate defeated would have dramatically increased health care costs, caused millions to lose their health coverage, and destabilized the insurance market.  “We thank Senators Collins, McCain, and Murkowski, …

— Sometimes legislation in Congress has unintended consequences.  This is one of those times. The proposed Senate health care bill would increase costs and risks for individuals in Wyoming including: seniors, children and adults with disabilities, people with pre-existing conditions, and those ages 50-64. But, let’s start with Wyoming’s taxpayers. As it stands, the proposed bill would drastically cut federal funding for Medicaid which supports health programs for vulnerable Americans, in Wyoming. Such a huge loss of funds, in total $772 …

—   AARP Maine’s Live Tele-Town Hall with US Senator Angus King on Health Care Reveals Senate Bill’s Impact for Mainers 50+   Ten Thousand AARP Members Participate, Deep Concerns Raised   PORTLAND: Tonight, US Senator Angus King participated in a live AARP Maine-sponsored tele-town hall. The discussion focused on the newly-released Senate health care bill (The Better Care Reconciliation Act) and the impact the legislation could have on Mainers 50+.  Ten thousand AARP members from across the state joined the …