— When AARP volunteer Laurie Kaneshiro brought her mother home to Hawaii to take care of her, she had no idea what was ahead and how much it would cost. “I was used to working 14 to 16 hours a day,” she said. But when her mother, who suffered from dementia and other ailments, came to live with her, Kaneshiro found herself needing to take time off at work to make sure her mother was eating and didn’t fall and hurt …

— Insight Memory Care Center invites you to Conversations with Caregivers! These sessions provide an opportunity for learning and open discussion with local authors on topics of interest for caregivers of a loved one with dementia or a related memory impairment. Join us for a great morning of conversation! Conversations with Caregivers! Wednesday, March 29, 2017 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Linda and Lou Mazawey Education and Support Center 3955 Pender Drive, Suite 100, Fairfax, VA 22030 (Directions) RSVP is kindly …

— Almost 90 percent of Americans 65 and older want to stay in their home as they age, but Mississippi lags behind 35 states and the District of Columbia in using Medicaid funds to help residents achieve that goal. Only 27 percent of Medicaid dollars earmarked for long-term care of older Mississippians and those with disabilities are allocated to home- and community-based services. The other 73 percent pays for nursing home care. “Most people want to stay in their own home …

— FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 02/07/2017 Contact:          Lori Parham, AARP Maine State Director lparham@aarp.org 400-1026 Amy Gallant, AARP Maine Advocacy Director agallant@aarp.org 318-0284   AARP Maine Responds to Governor’s 2017 State-of-the-State Address: Raises Concerns of Mainers 50+ and Offers Policy Solutions   PORTLAND: AARP Maine is responding tonight to Governor Paul LePage’s State of the State address delivered this evening in Augusta. “Given Maine is the oldest state, AARP Maine appreciates the Governor’s concern for older Mainers,” said Lori Parham, AARP Maine State Director. “However, policies that …

— As the 132nd General Session for Ohio convened, Speaker of the House Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville) announced the formation of a new standing committee on Aging & Long-Term Care to focus on the strategies and solutions that can support Ohioans and their families as they age. State Director of AARP Ohio Barbara A. Sykes said, “The aging of our population is a demographic wave that will reshape every community in this state, our nation – and most of the world. We …

— Seven out of 10 Americans turning 65 can expect to need long-term care during their lifetime, and 9 out of 10 Louisianans want to live at home as they age. Yet 70 percent of Medicaid funding for long-term care in the state goes to nursing homes. AARP wants to rebalance the long-term care system by shifting more money to services that help people stay in their own homes as they age, which is a more cost-effective use of tax dollars. …

—   In our culture, the ALF – and the other acronymed places for the elderly, fragile, and disabled – constitutes both the family, those at-hand, and village, out-there in the social order. The caregiver is the person at-hand in assisted living.  For me, she – and it’s almost always she –  cleans my glasses, opens my mail, dresses and undresses me, showers me, puts me on and takes me off the toilet, wipes me.  What kind of person does it …

— With the vast majority of older Missourians wanting to remain in their homes and communities as they age, the contribution of family caregivers cannot be overlooked. This silent army is the backbone of elder care in our state, providing unpaid care valued at about $8.9 billion annually. Without the help of family caregivers, too many of our seniors would end up in costly institutions – often paid for by the state, through Medicaid. As we take a moment to recognize …

— Utah lags behind 40 states and the District of Columbia in using Medicaid funds to help older adults and those with physical disabilities continue to live independently. Only 23 percent of Medicaid dollars earmarked for long-term care for this population in Utah is allocated to home- and community-based services such as home-delivered meals, transportation to doctors’ appointments and respite for family caregivers. The other 77 percent pays for nursing homes. “We know the vast majority of Utahns want to stay …

— By Dick Weinman, AARP Oregon volunteer and Assisted Living Guru I have free choice of mind to do what I want. I don’t have the body to do it. I depend on others to do it for me. The “others” may own, manage, or staff the facilities of a new and growing Long Term Care (LTC) industry, now bulging because the “Baby Boomers” have boomed, increasing the need to care for the weak, ill, or damaged, who languish in their midst. …