— FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 16, 2017 CONTACT:  AARP Media Relations, 202-434-2560, media@aarp.org, @AARP Media Washington, DC – A new AARP survey shows that an overwhelming percentage (84 percent) of American private sector workers “strongly or somewhat agree” that officials should back legislation to enable workers “to save their own money for retirement.” The survey of nearly 4,000 workers aged 18 to 64 included a significant oversampling of African Americans, Latinos/as and Asian Americans.  The survey finds strong backing across all …

— Every month, millions of Pennsylvanians receive their electric utility bill and I would guess that many of us look at the total, maybe grumble a little, then make a payment and go on with our business.  I would also hazard a guess that most consumers don’t know how to read or understand their utility bills, and don’t know exactly what the charges are for or how one could be saving money.  Do you know the difference between ‘supplier’ and ‘distributor’?  …

— As we enter the holiday season, many shoppers are juggling long grocery lists for that big family gathering and long gift lists for their loved ones. For some, this holiday season brings the excitement of shopping, cooking, and gift-wrapping. For others, this holiday season is a precursor to the hefty credit card statement or empty wallet. AARP PA sat down with Mary Bach, Consumer Issues Task Force Chair, to talk about ways to save money this holiday season. AARP: Mary, …

— At an emergency meeting with its Board of Directors, VI Water and Power Authority (WAPA) Executive Director Hugo Hodge, introduced a plan to take advantage of the dropping cost of propane and other fuels. The plan requested permission to re-institute its former “Hedge Program” with a few modifications. Hodge justified the request saying that “Taking advantage in the drop of propane prices will give ratepayers significant cost savings.” Traditional hedge programs allow a utility to take advantage of price drops …

— Virginia taxpayers can no longer receive state tax refunds by check. Instead, they must take the money by direct bank deposit or on a debit card. Both paper and software versions of state income tax returns will require filers to choose one of the two options. Eliminating paper checks is expected to save about $200,000 in printing and mailing costs this year. Virginians who choose direct deposit should bring a voided check when visiting a tax preparer. Those who choose …