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— Women voters in Ohio have a message for the presidential candidates: Tell us more about your plans for Social Security. A lot more. And I would add one more point: Political leaders should act now to update the program. It’s time to stop kicking the Social Security can down the road. Those are some highlights from a new AARP survey in Ohio of likely women voters age 50 and up. A few more: • 73% want the next president and …

Sisters Jackie and Mary Jo Presserly say they would have to give up their car if their Social Security benefits are cut.

— Battleground state women voters want action RICHMOND _ Eighty-one years after the program was signed into law, a new analysis conducted by AARP shows that 4.5 million Virginia workers who are paying into Social Security today could lose 25 percent of their benefits if the President and Congress don’t act, and women voters want something done about it.   At a forum on Social Security in Chicago today, AARP leaders released results of a new poll of likely battleground state …

A native of coastal Maine, here's Lloyd in his natural element.

— After he’d had a chance to read our first two volunteer profiles, AARP member Lloyd Farnham had let me know that he would be more than happy to be a part of our next piece. I’d suggested meeting in our Field Office or over coffee at a nearby café, but he was quite adamant about wanting to have the interview in his home. All seemed innocent at first. But as I walked through the front door of his Concord home, …

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— Boise, ID — New analysis conducted by AARP shows that 806,000 Idaho workers who are paying into Social Security today stand to lose 25 percent of their benefits if the President and Congress don’t act. While the revenue shortfall faced by the Social Security system that could result in cuts is not imminent, in June, the Social Security Trustees reported that the trust fund would run dry in 2034. After that time, across-the-board cuts of nearly 25 percent would take …

Aww shucks, Tim. You’re making us blush.

— While lesser campaigns might be tuckered out after our breakneck week covering The Donald, Take A Stand New Hampshire proved once again that we New Englanders are as sturdy as Robert Frost’s backyard fence. We hit the ground running on Monday with a sweet ice cream social at Arnie’s Place in Concord. On Tuesday, we took a trip up to the AARP NH State Office to lend a hand with an interactive Tele-Town Hall featuring our esteemed Governor Maggie Hassan. …

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— Program Vital to Virginians’ Financial Security Because Social Security is critical to Virginians’ financial security, AARP Virginia will participate in the Second Annual Senior Safety Day at First Baptist Church of Richmond from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 17.   More than 300 people—the maximum capacity—are registered to attend the event, which is presented by the Senior Center of Greater Richmond, the Office of the Attorney General Mark Herring and the First Baptist Church of Richmond. The …

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— Join AARP for its Take A Stand tour. AARP will visit Fruita, Aurora, Fort Collins, Colorado Springs and Pueblo this year and you are invited to attend at a location near you to discuss state and federal legislative priorities with AARP Colorado staff and volunteers throughout the month of September. Why Take A Stand? If our leaders don’t act, future retirees could lose up to $10,000 a year in Social Security benefits. Doing nothing is not an option. That’s why AARP …

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— Social Security Turns 81 Today; If It’s Not Updated, New Yorkers Could Face Tough Choices on What to do Without NEW YORK, N.Y. — New analysis conducted by AARP shows that 10.4 million workers across New York who are paying into Social Security today stand to lose 25 percent of their benefits if the President and Congress don’t act. While the revenue shortfall faced by the Social Security system that could result in these cuts is not imminent, in June, …

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— New analysis conducted by AARP shows that 1.1 million Nebraska workers who are paying into Social Security today stand to lose 25 percent of their benefits if the President and Congress don’t act. While the revenue shortfall faced by the Social Security system that could result in cuts is not imminent, in June, the Social Security Trustees reported that the trust fund would run dry in 2034. After that time, across-the-board cuts of nearly 25 percent would take effect if …

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— New analysis conducted by AARP shows that 784,000 Granite State workers who are paying into Social Security today stand to lose 25 percent of their benefits if the President and Congress don’t act. While the revenue shortfall faced by the Social Security system that could result in cuts is not imminent, the Social Security Trustees reported in June that across-the-board cuts of nearly 25 percent would take effect in 2034 if no action is taken. “Doing nothing is not an …