Senate Candidates Heller & Rosen in Statistical Tie Among Nevada 50-Plus Voters; Older Voters Oppose Ballot Question 3

Nevada voters age 50 and over are united in their concern over education, health care, and the economy according to a newly released AARP poll. The poll found the state’s lagging educational system and overall concern over health care are critically important issues to 50-plus voters as they cast their ballots this fall. In addition, a strong bi-partisan majority oppose Ballot Question 3 which would deregulate the state’s energy system by amending Nevada’s constitution. The survey is part of AARP’s “Be The Difference. Vote™” campaign and continues AARP’s long tradition of nonpartisan voter engagement.

“With less two weeks to go before Election Day, candidates in Nevada would be wise to listen to the state’s most powerful voting group: 50-plus voters,” said Maria Dent, AARP Nevada State Director. “History shows older voters turn out in force and AARP is seeking to ensure issues of particular importance to older voters are front and center – issues like Medicare, Social Security, prescription drug costs, and family caregiving.”

The poll findings also point to close races for Nevada’s high-profile Senate and Governor’s races. The candidates for Nevada’s U.S. Senate seat are in a statistical tie among Silver State voters age 50 and over. Of the 950 people polled, 44 percent said they would vote for incumbent Republican Senator Dean Heller if the election were held today while 43 percent said they would vote for Democratic challenger Congresswoman Jacky Rosen. Thirteen percent were still undecided.

In the race for Nevada governor, current Republican Nevada Attorney General Adam Laxalt holds a slim lead over Clark County Commissioner Steve Sisolak. Laxalt was supported by 44 percent of those polled while Sisolak was favored by 41 percent. A large number of voters remain undecided how they will vote for governor with 15 percent telling us they’re unsure of how they’ll vote.

Respondents also expressed their displeasure over a statewide ballot question aiming to deregulate and reorganize Nevada’s energy market. Of all likely voters polled, an overwhelming majority of voters 50-plus said they will vote no on Ballot Question 3. Twenty-eight (28) percent said they’ll vote yes and 15 percent say they’re undecided. The support for No on 3 crosses party lines as 55 percent of Democrats polled oppose the constitutional amendment and 62 percent of Republicans say they’ll vote no. Even independents oppose the ballot question with 54 percent saying they’ll vote no.

Even though it’s not a presidential election year, President Donald Trump’s job approval rating was even amongst all voters with 49 percent of Nevadans polled approving of his job performance and 49 percent disapproving. These results were straight down party lines with 91 percent of Republicans 18+ approving of Trump’s performance while 89 percent of Democrats disapprove. Among independents, Trump’s approval rating is 49 percent to 47 percent who disapprove.

The Nevada poll also found:

  • 76 percent of 50-plus voters are concerned Congress will take action to harm Medicare, and 63 percent oppose so-called “Premium Support” for Medicare.
  • Six percent of Nevadans over 50 have a favorable view of Medicaid, as opposed to 29 percent who view the program as unfavorable. The vast majority of Nevadans over 50 supports the current approach where the state determines who qualifies for Medicaid.
  • 70 percent feel that candidates’ positions on rising prescription drug costs are very important to them, and 94 percent want to see proposals in Congress to allow Medicare to negotiate with drug companies for lower prices.
  • 78 percent say they’d vote for a candidate who would strengthen Social Security and make Medicare more financially stable and improve benefits to the most vulnerable. Additionally, 46 percent of voters 50+ think Congress will make changes to Social Security that will harm seniors.
  • 90 percent support providing an income tax credit to family caregivers.

The survey is part of AARP’s “Be the Difference. Vote” campaign designed to encourage older Americans to make their voices heard at the ballot box this fall. For more information on AARP’s “Be The Difference. Vote,” campaign and to pledge to vote in this year’s elections, go to www.aarp.org/vote.

The poll, conducted by Alan Newman Research, surveyed 950 voters over 50 between 9/6-9/26-18 and has a margin of error of +/-3. View full survey results HERE. aarp.org/2018StateVoterSurveys

AARP does not endorse candidates or make contributions to political parties, political campaigns or candidates.