Caregiving

Love is always being there for each other
MORRISVILLE, NC – The North Carolina Institute of Medicine (NCIOM) has released a report with 30 recommendations for health care providers, state agencies, advocacy organizations, professional associations, and health care payers to support individuals with serious illness, their caregivers, and their communities.
Alzheimers
About 5.8 million people in the U.S. have Alzheimer's disease. Of those about two-thirds are women, and that number is growing. According to a new report from the AARP-founded Global Council on Brain Health, by 2050, the number of Americans living with Alzheimer's is expected to reach 13.8 million. More than 9 million Alzheimer’s patients will be women.
Families try to stay connected with loved ones in nursing homes
As COVID-19 restrictions have eased in Mississippi, nursing homes and other long-term care facilities eventually will prepare to resume in-person visits for families. While this may happen in the future, now is the time to prepare. Experts say in-person visits will be different than before the pandemic, at least until the threat of coronavirus has passed. There may be limits on when, where and for how long you can see loved ones, and distancing rules will likely be in place.
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AARP North Carolina's "Let's Get Livable Over Lunch Series"
Caregiver, carer hand holding elder hand in hospice care. Philanthropy kindness to disabled concept.
If you were at the hospital and unable to speak, how would medical personnel know what kind of treatment you want or whom you want to make decisions for you?
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It was to be only a 30-day respite trial period when Vittorio C., a proud, strong, 84-year-old New Yorker, went to a memory-care facility in South Florida during March of this year.
aarp nevada nursing homes CARES Act stimulus payment
As COVID-19 restrictions ease in Nebraska, nursing homes and other long-term care facilities are preparing to resume in-person visits for families. Visits won’t be the same as before the pandemic, at least until the threat of coronavirus has passed. There may be limits on when, where and for how long you can see loved ones, and distancing rules will likely be in place.
Assisted elderly man sitting in wheelchair
As COVID-19 restrictions ease in Virginia, nursing homes and other long-term care facilities are preparing to resume in-person visits for families. Visits won’t be the same as before the pandemic, at least until the threat of coronavirus has passed. There may be limits on when, where and for how long you can see loved ones, and distancing rules will likely be in place.
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5 Questions to Ask About Visiting Nursing Homes
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