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Recently, there has be an uptick in reports of scam calls claiming to be from the Social Security Administration. During these calls the scammer tells their potential victim that they will not be receiving their Social Security check because they have been “blacklisted” or they are in trouble with the authorities. We believe one of the reasons these calls have “bubbled up” might be because people are aware of the IRS scam and scammers are looking for a different way to scare their victim into sending money or sharing their personal information.
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Social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram provide a convenient way to connect with friends and family. It is important to remember that scammers also use these platforms to find victims. Scammers often create fake profiles and pretend to either be someone you know, someone you want to know or an entity you trust. Because there are fake profiles it is difficult to know who you can trust. The following are some red flags that you might be targeted by a scammer on Facebook or other social media platform:
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In recognition of Black History Month, AARP Driver Safety is offering a 25 percent discount on the award-winning AARP Smart Driver online course throughout the entire month of February.
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Are you looking to escape the cold and hit the beach this winter? On a snowy day, soaking up some sun in a tropical location sounds pretty nice!  
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‘Tis the season for excessive shopping and since many people will purchase their holiday gifts online, this is a good time to brush up on some internet safety tips. Here are a few reminders for protecting your personal and financial information while shopping online:
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Scammers may pose as relatives or friends, calling or sending messages to urge you to wire money immediately. They’ll say they need cash to help with an emergency – like getting out of jail, paying a hospital bill or needing to leave a foreign country. Their goal is to trick you into sending money before you realize it’s a scam.
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Warm summer months often lead to more door-to-door solicitations. Regardless of if you believe the person at your door is a legitimate solicitor or not, it is important to remain skeptical and cautious about the stranger, especially if they are trying to sell you something. Scammers often try and solicit donations for charity, offer a home repair service or pose as a utility worker.
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The ElderWatch Helpline has been fielding lots of calls about the “Say Yes” scam. Many news reports have warned that a scammer will call and ask a question to get the victim to say “Yes.” Then, reportedly, the scammer records that “Yes” to use it to authorize unwanted charges to a phone bill, utility bill or a credit card.
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Scammers posing as IRS agents or Treasury Department officials are continuing their deceptive ways. First and foremost, it is important to remember the IRS will first contact you through the mail. If you receive a phone call or suspicious email or text from the IRS, chances are it’s a scammer posing as an IRS agent. Are you still unsure? Here are some red flags that the call, email or text you received is not really the IRS:
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Americans age 50 and older face choices and pressures unlike those of any other age group – choices few could have prepared for. As the charitable affiliate of AARP, AARP Foundation is working with struggling people 50 and over so they can regain their confidence as good providers and members of their communities. The Foundation focuses on four priorities: hunger, income, housing and isolation.
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