Utilities Commission

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In response to the NC Supreme Court's decision in April that requires the North Carolina Utilities Commission to factor the interests of residential consumers in order to justify the 10.5 percent return on equity it granted to Duke Energy in 2012. AARP is arguing that double digit profit guaranteed to Duke is inconsistant with the state's economic realities.
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As the N.C. Utilities Commission takes Duke Energy's long-term plan to the public for its reaction in a series of hearings this month, the majority of North Carolinians feel that Duke's 20 year plan, known as the IRP, relies too heavily on rate hikes and isn't focusing enough on the use of cleaner, cheaper and more efficient energy.
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“AARP is deeply concerned about the government’s rate settlement with Progress Energy, which in the midst of public hearings, was hastily negotiated during closed-door meetings between company lawyers and the Utilities Commission as they secretly calculated how much ratepayers will shoulder.  Isn’t a role of the Commission to listen to the people who will be paying the bills?
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