— ’Tis the season to be merry—and to watch out for fraud. Scammers take full advantage of the giving season by trying to bilk people out of their cash, goods and identities. AARP Delaware reminds First Staters to be on the alert for schemes that are common at this time of year. Typical holiday scams include online shopping fraud. Con artists offer unrealistic discounts on popular brand items, then steal the “buyer’s” credit card information. Scammers also post phony charity solicitations …

— In the aftermath of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, and Maria, charity scams are coming at us by text, email, phone and social media. Scammers look to take advantage of our desire to help victims. If you plan to donate, make sure your money is going to the right place. Check Charity Navigator (www.charitynavigator.org), Charity Watch (www.charitywatch.org) and Give.org to verify names and organizations before opening your heart – and wallet. Be a fraud fighter!  If you can spot a scam, …

— Learn simple steps to increase your online security Are you an easy target for online hackers or scammers? By learning some simple steps to secure your phone, increase your online safety and recognize scams, you reduce your risk of becoming the next victim. That’s why it’s a smart move to attend AARP’s Online Safety Workshop. In this live, one-hour online event, you’ll be guided by your workshop host as you learn the latest in online safety. You’ll also learn about …

— With Delawareans being victimized at an alarming rate by fraudulent pop-up messages that warn computer users of a purported virus infection or urgently needed repair, the AARP Fraud Watch Network has launched a major campaign to raise awareness of the “Tech Support Scam.” Newly launched advertising, social media content and an online video invite people to visit the Fraud Watch Network’s webpage, www.aarp.org/TechScams, to learn about the latest scam tactics.  A booklet co-published by AARP and Microsoft Corp., “Avoiding Tech Support …

—    Document-Shredding Events and Information Will Help Delawareans Avoid Fraud The AARP Fraud Watch Network brings fraud-fighting efforts to consumers nationwide in “Operation: Stop Scams” — a month-long series of events in communities coast-to-coast. Here in Delaware, AARP is collaborating with the YMCA of Delaware to host events in Newark and Rehoboth. The events will include free shredding services, information on fraud and scams, refreshments, prizes and fun. The events are free and open to the public. “Many Delawareans clear …

— Netflix customers beware! Scammers are conducting a campaign to obtain personal and financial information from Netflix users across the country. Netflix users are receiving an email claiming to be from the company asking them to update their Netflix login information. After providing this, a second screen appears which asks users to validate their payment information. After providing their information on the fraudulent website, the Netflix customers are re-directed to the actual Netflix homepage. The phishing email looks surprisingly realistic and …

— Romance scams start with fake profiles on online dating sites. The scammer, who is conveniently working abroad, quickly builds a relationship with the targeted victim, exchanging photos, romantic messages, or even talking by phone. Then they will make a request: money needed for an emergency or maybe to plan an in-person visit. The target sends money, and then never hears from the love interest again. Be a fraud fighter!  If you can spot a scam, you can stop a scam. …

— The more you know, the less likely you are to become a victim of investment fraud.  Who is most likely to fall prey to investment fraud? Older men who are risk-takers, open to investment pitches and see accumulating wealth as a key achievement in life. That’s according to a new study sponsored by AARP’s Fraud Watch Network that surveyed 1,028 investors, nearly a quarter of whom were victims of fraud. The study’s goal is to identify risk factors or behaviors that make someone fall …

— Ads for jobs guaranteeing you will make a certain amount of money or that you can work from home are probably scams. If you respond to the ad, you’ll likely be asked to send money so you can either get the job, acquire more job listings, receive supplies to start a business at home, or obtain special “certification” that’s supposed to get you a job. If an ad for a job sounds too good to be true, it probably is. …

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— There’s a new scam we recently heard about. A resident receives an official-looking letter from a law firm in the state, outlining a family member’s prior criminal conviction, describing the verdict, and then stating there is an outstanding fine or fee. The letter directs the resident to send a check to clear the expense. If you receive a letter like this, contact local law enforcement. Be a fraud fighter!  If you can spot a scam, you can stop a scam. …