— Measure 101—which voters will decide in a Jan. 23 special election—aims to ensure that state assessments on health insurance companies and hospitals will continue to be matched by federal dollars. These funds can be used for one purpose only: to provide affordable health care for Oregonians. AARP Oregon is encouraging members to vote ‘yes’ on the measure. Other supporters include the Oregon Medical Association, Oregon Nurses Association and Providence Health & Services. If the measure fails, more than 350,000 Oregonians …

—   Salem – AARP Oregon honored state legislators with “Down the Trail” awards for developing bi-partisan solutions to help older adults. Oregon’s former State Treasurer and legislator, Ben Westlund, was known as a statesman who brought people together to find bipartisan solutions to problems facing Oregon. “Bipartisan solutions can help us create policy that’s in the best interest of all Oregonians,” said Jerry Cohen AARP Oregon State Director. To honor Westlund’s bipartisanship, AARP Oregon named our top legislative award after …

— Clackamas, OR – To recognize their integral work to support family caregivers in Oregon, AARP names Sen. Elizabeth Steiner Hayward, Sen. Jackie Winters, Sen. Richard Devlin, Sen. Tim Knopp, Rep. Nancy Nathanson, Rep. Dan Rayfield, and Rep. Greg Smith as 2017 “Capitol Caregivers,” a bipartisan group of nearly 100 elected officials from more than 30 states. These leaders have advanced policies to support Oregon’s family caregivers, who help their parents, spouses and other loved ones live independently at home and …

— A new state law supported by AARP Oregon cracks down on distracted driving. Drivers cannot touch their phones behind the wheel. Hands-free phone usage is still allowed. The law took effect Oct. 1, along with higher fines. Previously, police officers had to see a driver speaking into a phone or texting in order to issue a citation. A state task force recommended the stricter law when traffic fatalities increased after a decade-long decline. In 2016, 495 people died on Oregon …

—   Oregon’s workforce is feeling anxious about retirement – more than half don’t have a workplace retirement savings option. But the retirement landscape is changing in the state with the launch of OregonSaves. “OregonSaves is an easier way to save for retirement,” said Joyce DeMonnin, communications and media relations director for AARP Oregon. “It’s specifically for the 1 million Oregonians who don’t have a retirement option at their work.” The OregonSaves program got high marks from a DHM Research poll …

— By Mac McLean Sheila Miller knew there would be changes when she moved from working for a daily newspaper to Statehood Media, a regional lifestyle media company based in Bend and Portland. She had to give up a retirement savings plan that automatically took money from her paycheck. Miller, 37, didn’t think she would miss this benefit until she realized how much her plan at the newspaper had helped her save. Then her new employer signed up with OregonSaves, a …

— Join AARP Oregon staff and volunteers this July at an AARP Activist  & Volunteer meeting near you.  Discover what we are doing in your community. Get an update on AARP’s local, state and national outreach and advocacy efforts for the first half of the year and what’s ahead. We also want to hear from you. Come share your thoughts about the issues that matter to you. Connect with others in your community and find out how you can continue to stay engaged, including as …

— On Memorial Day, we honor the soldiers and service members who have given their lives for our nation. Social Security respects the heroism and courage of our military service members, and we remember those who have given their lives in defense of freedom. Part of how we honor service members is the way we provide Social Security benefits. The unexpected loss of a family member is a difficult experience for anyone. Social Security helps by providing benefits to protect service …

— By Mac McLean Juanita Santana knew exactly what came next when she retired from her job as director of a Head Start program in San Francisco. She moved to Portland in 2010 and became a full-time caregiver for her parents. That took up so much time that she never thought about what life would be like after they died, which happened a few years later. “It was real difficult for me to find my niche in retirement,” said Santana, 66. …

— By Merry MacKinnon As newcomers flock to Oregon, soaring housing values are enriching property owners while big rent hikes are pricing out lower-income tenants. “It’s brutal out there,” said Briana Winterborn, a program coordinator for Elders in Action, a Portland nonprofit advocating for older adults. Each week she gets calls from harried renters facing eviction. One client reported a $400 monthly rent increase, which she called a de facto eviction. Under pressure to protect the 39 percent of Oregon’s households …