— AARP is here to help you take on today – and every day. From sharing practical resources, to holding fun activities and events, AARP is providing opportunities to connect and help build an even stronger Texas for all ages to live, work and play. We hope you’ll join us!

— Dallas just took a big step towards becoming a more “age-friendly” city as the Dallas City Council today voted unanimously to approve the Age-Friendly Dallas Plan. This tool will serve as the roadmap for a raft of changes designed to make Dallas more livable for people of all ages. With a population of 1.3 million people, Dallas is ranked the ninth-fastest growing community of people age 65 and older in the country. Nearly 24% of the city’s population today is …

— The race is on to replace Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings with a record number of contenders. Nine individuals have filed for candidacy, and Dallas County Election Day is May 4. With this number of candidates, a runoff election may be necessary if no single candidate takes home a plurality of the votes. Read on to learn about each candidate currently in the running to be the new mayor.       2019 Dallas Mayoral Candidates   Mike Ablon Age: 54 …

— By Laura Tillman AARP Texas is working hard to make communities more livable for everyone, whether it’s new curbs for easier walking or an art installation to brighten a public space. For those aging in place and confronting mobility challenges and fixed incomes, livability can mean the difference between connecting with the community or growing isolated. Here’s how five Texas cities are improving life for their residents. Houston Since August 2017, when Hurricane Harvey damaged hundreds of thousands of homes, …

— Despite continued suburban sprawl, communities across the nation are taking steps to become better places to live in and age in, according to data analyzed from the newly updated AARP Livability Index. And Austin is being recognized among those cities, joining the Top 10 list for the first time among cities with a population of 500,000 or more. Across the U.S., more communities are enacting policies to improve livability with notable increases in housing trust funds that set aside revenue …

— By Tom Korosec On a chilly day late last October, Bob Bonilla and other AARP volunteers grabbed brooms and paintbrushes and went to work making their Fort Worth neighborhood more walkable and age-friendly. They painted curbs and crosswalks and created a “pop-up” traffic circle to slow vehicles and make their gentrifying neighborhood safer for pedestrians. “Earlier we did a walking tour to identify some of the problems,” said Bonilla, 67, a retired schoolteacher. They noted that residents of a nearby …

— As we age, our eyesight and reaction time steadily declines, and in a big city like Austin, the drivers that share the road tend to be less than friendly. Public transportation lessens the risk of vehicular accidents, alleviating the stress of being behind the wheel (especially during rush hour). Pat Thomas, an Austin resident and AARP member, started a group called Roll & Stroll in 2015 to help show others the convenience and practicality of public transportation, while touring new …

5 States

— The favorite holiday of our proud state falls on Friday, March 2. While a weekend trip to the San Antonio Southside Missions is a popular way to commemorate our state’s independence, as a Texan, you’re probably not too keen on following the herd. Here are three rebellious ways that you can embrace your Texan identity and keep community close to your heart. Explore the Multicultural Lone Star State Houston was listed in 2017 as the most culturally diverse city in …

— AARP Texas is helping residents of the Linwood neighborhood in Fort Worth revitalize their urban community. The Better Block project engages community members in a two- to three-month planning process, which culminates in a weeklong collaborative effort to improve a city block physically or economically. In Linwood, the project is bringing to fruition residents’ ideas for solar lighting, traffic calming and pedestrian crosswalks. The project demonstrates AARP’s commitment to livable, age-friendly communities in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. Built in the …

— By Thomas Korosec After Hurricane Ike struck Houston in September 2008, volunteers with the nonprofit Avenue CDC helped fix Angela Guerrero’s grandmother’s house. Now Guerrero is in a position to repay the favor by helping restore houses damaged by Hurricane Harvey in August. Guerrero, 31, is part of a small army of volunteers in nonprofit organizations who are helping to restore their communities in Harvey’s wake. Many are being helped by funds from AARP Foundation, which has invested $3.2 million …