— As Hurricane Harvey ravaged Southeast Texas last August, one Texas assisted living facility (ALF) became infamous when a photo of elderly residents sitting in waist-deep water went viral. This image and other stories led AARP to examine complaints made to the Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) about the safety of residents in Texas’ assisted living facilities during and after the hurricane. Records show that a number of assisted living facility residents faced harm, neglect or abandonment during Harvey …

— Often overlooked when considering the long-term health of older adults, social isolation deserves to be addressed. Today, AARP estimates that 17% of adults age 50 and older suffer from isolation. Isolation is not always talked about but it is an important public health issue that affects millions of Americans.  But what is isolation, and who is prone to be affected by it? Isolation can affect anyone, no matter how social or physically capable they may seem. It takes two distinctive …

— Communities across Texas are working each and every day to become more livable for residents of all ages. In support of that work, AARP is excited to be able to provide funding to organizations through the AARP Community Challenge to help them jumpstart progress on ongoing work. These “quick action” grants are being distributed to 129 organizations, with at least one in every state, Washington D.C., and Puerto Rico, including right here in Texas. The Community Challenge grants provide communities …

— By Thomas Korosec When Elizabeth Ellis, a nurse practitioner, opened the B.I.S. Community Clinic last year, she became the first primary care provider based in the small town of Bedias in more than 80 years. “Rural health is why I became a nurse practitioner,” said Ellis, 53. During flu season this past winter, she saw about 160 patients a month—most either under 15 or older than 50, and mostly from rural Grimes County (pop. 26,000). Advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) …

— June is National Great Outdoors Month, a time for observing nature and enjoying our surrounding environments. Beginning as a week-long celebration of nature, we now nationally recognize the beautiful countryside, forests and parks of the United States for the entire month of June. This recognition promotes the splendor of our great outdoors and highlights the labors of those who work to preserve nature in our modern world. It raises the awareness of national policies on nature conservation by highlighting the …

— As a passenger on Austin’s Capital Metro buses, I had seen my share of AARP ads: smiling faces and discount offers for people age 50 and over. In the classroom, AARP even surfaced on a copy editing exam. The question asked how to write the organization’s name in Associated Press Style. (It’s “AARP,” of course.) Upon applying for an internship with AARP, I saw the nonprofit social welfare organization as a familiar crimson logo, neatly contained. In the year since …

— Asian Pacific American Heritage Month (APAHM) celebrates the accomplishments and culture of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the United States. This national recognition helps to garner awareness for a minority often underrepresented in American culture. Today, Asian and Pacific Islanders make up around 4% of the total population in Texas. However, they are the fastest growing racial group in the state, with nearly 30% more growth than the closest ethnicity group. America is enriched through the contributions of Asian Americans, …

— Texans living in rural areas continue to struggle with access to broadband internet, a utility that is increasingly essential to everyday life. As connectivity becomes mandatory for the requirements of everyday life, including access to education, health care, job applications and bill pay, more people are being forced to choose between the high cost of at-home service or being cut off from the modern world. To help develop community-driven solutions, Glasshouse Policy recently hosted a town hall and stakeholder event …

— By Tom Korosec On a chilly day late last October, Bob Bonilla and other AARP volunteers grabbed brooms and paintbrushes and went to work making their Fort Worth neighborhood more walkable and age-friendly. They painted curbs and crosswalks and created a “pop-up” traffic circle to slow vehicles and make their gentrifying neighborhood safer for pedestrians. “Earlier we did a walking tour to identify some of the problems,” said Bonilla, 67, a retired schoolteacher. They noted that residents of a nearby …

— How can we improve our cities and neighborhoods to enhance quality of life as we age? A recent symposium on aging in Austin emphasized a simple common theme: let holistic community solutions take center stage. The Livability for Longevity symposium was co-hosted by the LBJ School of Public Affairs and AustinUP, a local non-profit aging organization focused on the fact that the greater Austin area has the nation’s fastest growing population of people age 55 to 64. The panel discussions focused on …