— AARP is here to help you take on today – and every day. From sharing practical resources, to holding fun activities and events, AARP is providing opportunities to connect and help build an even stronger Washington for all ages to live, work and play. We hope you’ll join us!

— Would you like to preserve a veteran’s story in the Library of Congress? We are working with the Yakima office of Congressman Dan Newhouse to provide training on how to conduct interviews to the Library’s standards and also how to submit historical material for the collection. The Library has guidelines that make it simple for you to get a good interview that will become a part of our nation’s history. Find out how from a trainer who is coming to …

— Welcome to the homepage for the AARP Washington State Podcast. Our podcast focuses on Health, Wealth & Self, and how we can make life after age 50 the best years of our lives. You can find us on iTunes and subscribe here. Or you can listen through any podcast app. Just search for “AARP Washington State Podcast”. And don’t forget to check out AARP’s national podcasts, such as The Perfect Scam, a weekly podcast from our Fraud Watch Network featuring …

— The King County Assessor’s Office reports that thousands of state homeowners are missing out on substantial property-tax savings. AARP Washington urges those 61 or older to determine if they qualify for the state’s Senior Property Tax Exemption. To be eligible, you must have an annual household disposable income of no more than $40,000. The savings depend on income and property values. The exemptions also apply to those who retired because of disability and veterans with a service-related disability. AARP Washington …

— By Dana E. Neuts Thirty years after retiring from Boeing, John Pehrson, 91, of Seattle, is helping the city become age-friendly. Pehrson is the volunteer chairman of the Market to MOHAI project. When complete, the 1.4-mile pedestrian corridor will stretch 20 blocks from Pike Place Market to the Museum of History & Industry (MOHAI) at South Lake Union. The corridor will include lighting and signage aimed at pedestrians and connect two Seattle landmarks and four parks—Lake Union, Denny, Bell Street …

— By Vanessa Ho Every weekend, Mark Diimmel goes out for dinner and a movie with his sister, who often takes him to get Chinese or Italian food, or maybe burgers and a milkshake. Diimmel, 64, has schizophrenia and lives in an adult family home in Bremerton, paid for by Medicaid and Social Security. But the outings have become more difficult. Everything costs more, while his personal-needs allowance—the amount of income Diimmel is allowed to keep for himself—has remained the same, …

— By Dana E. Neuts Last year, Lucia Bodenheimer’s husband was diagnosed with the early stages of dementia. A friend referred her to Elder Services, part of the statewide Family Caregiver Support Program. Bodenheimer, 78, of Spokane, now attends twice-monthly meetings to discuss concerns and get support from fellow caregivers. “I found myself in a situation I knew nothing about,” she said. “I felt like I was drowning and I needed a life jacket. This supplied that life jacket with a …

— A new state law backed by AARP Washington aims to improve communication between hospitals and family caregivers and to ease patients’ transitions back home. The Caregiver Advise, Record, Enable (CARE) Act, which took effect June 9, directs hospitals to notify a designated caregiver before a patient is discharged and to show the caregiver how to perform follow-up tasks the patient will need at home. Washington is the 24th state to enact such a law. In a recent AARP survey, more …

— By Vanessa Ho When Char Tait’s mother was living in long-term care facilities, Tait was grateful for the volunteer ombudsmen who visited her mother and helped explain her legal rights as a resident. “It gave her a voice she didn’t think she had,” said Tait, who lives in the Chelan County town of Manson. The experience inspired Tait to volunteer as an ombudsman in 2011. Now 69, Tait spends six to eight hours a week visiting a handful of long-term …

— By Dana E. Neuts Theresa Stringer, 75, and her husband, Edward, 80, of Forks, have been taking the Dungeness Line from Port Angeles to Seattle for doctors’ appointments for 10 years. Edward, an amputee with Parkinson’s disease, uses a wheelchair, but with the help of trained drivers and a lift-equipped bus, he is able to make the three-hour trip to Seattle safely. Because the Stringers no longer drive, the Dungeness Line is a convenient, affordable way to travel. Instead of …

— By Leslee Jaquette It has been 13 years since June Palon’s husband, Bob, died of leukemia. But she remembers how lost she felt trying to care for him when he was released from the hospital on weekend furloughs. His oncologist preferred that the 74-year-old cancer patient remain in the hospital for treatment. But at Bob’s insistence, he was allowed to go home several weekends before being discharged to hospice care. He died shortly after. The main problem, said June, now …