— By Melissa Preddy After three decades of living with multiple sclerosis, Jacqueline Williams, 62, often can’t stand up without someone’s help, doesn’t drive and deals with a confusing array of doctors, social service agencies and Medicaid rules in managing her chronic condition. The state-funded aide who visits her Detroit apartment for four hours each day to help with personal hygiene and prepare simple meals enables Williams to avoid moving into a nursing home. She said she appreciates the help but …

— By Ann Hardie Unable to catch her breath, Juanita Wilkie was admitted to Piedmont Mountainside Hospital in Jasper and seen by a doctor—who was in Israel. The examination—done from 6,400 miles away—was possible thanks to the hospital’s high-speed internet and a mobile cart with monitor, computer and high-definition camera, used to connect to the Jerusalem doctor. “He even listened to my heart on that thing,” said Wilkie, who was treated for double pneumonia and is now home and feeling much …

— A bill that promises to expand health care access, especially in rural and other underserved areas of Michigan, won final passage today in the State Legislature. The House voted 102-7 on final passage. The Senate approved the legislation earlier. When signed by Gov. Rick Snyder, Michigan will become the 25th state to join the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. The Compact offers an expedited licensing process for physicians who want to practice medicine in multiple states. Joining the Compact would enable patients in Michigan, for example, to consult …

— Thanks to the great work of AARP advocates, the Bipartisan Budget Act signed last week by President Trump, includes several important wins when it comes to controlling our health care costs. Without your help to repeal caps to physical, occupational and speech therapies, seniors would have been forced to pay out of pocket for these services. The Budget Act also includes measures that AARP has long fought for to lower prescription drug costs including: Expediting the closing of the Medicare …

— The legislative session that begins Jan. 22 is only 45 days long. AARP Utah is prepared to hit the ground running to advocate on behalf of family caregivers, retirees and other adults 50-plus. AARP staff and volunteers will be at the Capitol every day. This year, the state office’s legislative priorities are to secure workplace leave for family caregivers, expand access to telehealth and keep the retirement income tax credit from phasing out for Utahns born after 1953. The AARP …