— By Tim Poor In his 30 years as a pharmacist, state Sen. David Sater (R-Cassville) saw firsthand the hard choices that many people must make when they can’t afford the medicine they need. “They forgo buying medication because they need a new refrigerator or car repair,” he said. “They don’t have a lot of extra money, so when something comes up, something’s got to go.” That’s why Sater has been leading a drive in the state legislature to fully restore …

— If the First Month of the Year is Any Indication, 2018 Could Turn Pennsylvania Politics Upside Down The history of Pennsylvania politics is full of colorful characters and maneuverings and intrigues that would make the poor little bill in the famous Schoolhouse Rock episode about the legislative process blush.  But 2018 could top the Commonwealth’s rather remarkable political past.  The headline this month is a ruling from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court invalidating Pennsylvania’s Congressional District boundaries and a further announcement …

— If you’ve been baffled by your utilities bill — and wondered who makes the rules for Florida power companies — you’re not alone. Millions of Florida residents find utilities issues hard to follow. Regulated by a far-away, low-profile state agency, largely the domain of expensive utilities lawyers and powerful corporations, electric utilities regulations often isn’t familiar ground for consumers. That’s one big reason why AARP Florida has been a leading voice fighting for consumers on utilities across the state and …

— What are the next steps for consumers in the V. C. Summer nuclear abandonment? In late November the House Judiciary committee advanced six bills to the General Assembly’s 2018 calendar. This action culminated after many hours of hearings by the House Utility Ratepayer Protection Committee. The hearings included testimony from AARP South Carolina, officials from SCE&G and Santee Cooper, state agencies, consumers and other advocates. Rep. Peter McCoy, R-Charleston, chairman of the special committee is the sponsor of all six …

— Kansans who receive Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income, public housing or other kinds of government benefits may be eligible for the state’s Lifeline program, which makes it more affordable to have a landline telephone. Savings can be as much as $17.02 a month. AARP Kansas is spreading the word about the program so that more people on fixed incomes can have a phone. For details or to apply, call your local phone company, go to kcc.ks.gov/pi/lifeline.htm or call the Kansas Corporation …