arthritis

Joint Health
AARP Kentucky is postponing the Workshop
Happy adult woman exercising at the gym with her coach
Living with Arthritis can be a challenge, but the EnhanceFitness at the YMCA is a fun way to feel energized and in-control. The fitness and arthritis management program gives you access to certified instructors in a comfortable, friendly environment.
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Patients often ask me about supplements and it’s easy to understand why. Just about every supermarket has an aisle of “natural” cures that claim to decrease arthritis pain. The question is: Do any of them work?
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The link between what you eat and how you feel is real, which is great news for people with arthritis. Research suggests that anti-inflammatory diets (low in sugars, carbohydrates and gluten and high in omega-3 fatty acids, olive oils and fiber) can help reduce joint pain and stiffness. Besides a healthful boost, this type of diet almost always leads to some surprising and rapid weight loss, taking pressure off bones and joints. Don’t be intimidated by the mistaken idea that you have to lose 25 lbs, an especially difficult task when joint pain restricts how much exercise you can do. The rule of thumb is that every 1 lb of weight loss reduces the force distributed through the hip, for example, three-fold.  A little bit of weight loss has a big impact!
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