— A couple of years ago Indianapolis Power & Light Co. (IPL) raised utility rates. Now they want to raise them again. IPL is requesting an increase of about $96.7 million in overall annual operating revenues – that’s a 7.1% increase!  Worse yet — they want to increase the “fixed charge” – which is the amount we customers pay regardless of how much electricity we use – from $17 to $27 a month. This is a 60% increase for Hoosier customers …

AARP works to fight to keep electric costs down
4 States

— APS is currently asking for approval to impose higher residential electric rates; a near doubling of the fixed charge portion of monthly basic rate plan electric bills, and imposing restrictions on rate plan choices for new customers. You don’t let the cell phone company pick your rate plan. So you wouldn’t want APS to either – especially if it restricts your choices for 90 days. These complicated proposals are included in a Settlement Agreement now before the Arizona Corporation Commission.  …

— Every month, millions of Pennsylvanians receive their electric utility bill and I would guess that many of us look at the total, maybe grumble a little, then make a payment and go on with our business.  I would also hazard a guess that most consumers don’t know how to read or understand their utility bills, and don’t know exactly what the charges are for or how one could be saving money.  Do you know the difference between ‘supplier’ and ‘distributor’?  …

—       If you’re a Westar Energy customer, are you ready to see your utility bills go up? That’s what’s going to happen if the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC) grants Westar’s request for a $152 million (almost 8%) annual rate increase. Residential customers with average monthly consumption of 900 kilowatt hours of electricity would have an average monthly increase of $13. In addition, Westar is requesting a return on equity, otherwise known as shareholder profit, of 10% and an …

—     On Monday, March 2, 2015, Westar Energy filed for a $152 million rate increase with the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC). If the increase is granted by the KCC, Westar estimates its residential customers would pay 7.9% more, or about $13 extra each month on their electric bills. Westar attributes the need for higher prices to the cost of retrofitting the La Cygne coal-fired plant to comply with environmental regulations, improvements to the Wolf Creek Nuclear Generating Station to …

— We’re very frustrated and disappointed after our state’s Public Service Commission (PSC) last week ignored the objections of more than 1,100 Dane County residents and granted Madison Gas and Electric (MGE) permission to raise its fixed monthly rates from $10.44 to $19 starting next year. MGE’s proposal does call for reducing its hourly usage rate by a few cents. But the PSC estimates the monthly rate increase coupled with the hourly rate decrease will translate to a $3 increase in …

— You stopped electric bills from rising   Bill Sundermeyer, who leads state advocacy efforts for AARP Ohio, today thanked the nearly 1,500 members who took the time to ask their lawmakers to stop proposed legislation that would hike residential electric bills throughout the state. “A special thank you all of you who took the time in the past two weeks  to call your Senate and House members articulating your opposition to Senate Bill 58 and House Bill 302,” Sundermeyer said. …

— Westar Energy, the largest electric utility in Kansas, has proposed raising rates for residential and small business customers while cutting rates for medium and large commercial customers. Westar officials have said the change would more fairly distribute costs because large businesses’ energy use is more stable than Kansans’ household use. Under the proposal, residential customers would see an increase in monthly bills of $7.50 on average, and some as much as $15. AARP is encouraging members to tell the Kansas …

— AARP California has been working to educate and engage the public in opposition to PG&E’s request for a $5.33 billion rate increase. Over the past two months, 43 AARP activists joined us at California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) public participation hearings in San Bruno, San Francisco, Fresno, and Oakland to testify about the impacts the rate increase would have on their families and communities. Over 1,400 AARP activists have also emailed the CPUC to say NO to higher utility rates. …

— Ameren Missouri is profiting to the tune of $350 million annually during Missouri’s worst economy since the Great Depression. And now they are at it again, pushing legislation that could allow billions in automatic rate increases (surcharges) for electric utilities with no meaningful review by the Public Service Commission. It will effect ratepayers all over the state. GET TO KNOW YOUR STATE SENATOR. Call or write, and encourage them to oppose Senate Bill 207 – TODAY! To read and follow SB207 …