Stop Rx Greed

Prescription Drugs
AARP continues its efforts to make prescription drugs more affordable in 2020 and will work for additional state legislation to lower rapidly rising prices
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AARP's Stop Rx Greed campaign is a national effort to bring drug cost awareness in front of government. Texans are urging action, telling their stories to the state’s representatives in Congress.
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AARP is supporting legislation aimed at lowering prescription drug prices and forcing pharmaceutical companies to justify large increases.
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AARP is urging lawmakers to take action to lower prescription drug prices and require more transparency from pharmaceutical companies.
Prescription Drugs
With big increases in drug prices, some older Hoosiers have been faced with a choice between buying food or paying for their medication.
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According to state data, drug price hikes in Minnesota about $110 Billion annually. That’s equal to 4x Minnesota’s state spending. Big prescription drug companies are making billions while charging those in need the highest prices. No Minnesotan should be forced to make the difficult decisions between paying for life-saving medications and buying food. It’s time to stop Rx greed!
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The average older American takes 4.5 prescriptions—and prices are rising much faster than inflation.
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AARP Michigan urges lawmakers to help caregivers and take action on rising prescription drug prices.
New York Rx State Factsheet
AARP Urges Governor Cuomo to Include Comprehensive State Plan to Attack High Prescription Drug Costs in Next NYS Budget Proposal
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It’s well known that prescription drug prices are skyrocketing in America. Price increases for brand name drugs have far exceeded the rate of inflation since at least 2006, according to AARP’s Rx Price Watch report. And the average annual cost for just one brand name drug taken on a chronic basis was about $6,800 in 2017, almost $1,000 more than in 2015. However, it’s not just patients paying for greedy Big Pharma practices that help keep drug prices high— it’s also taxpayers.
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