medicaid

State Capitol of Wisconsin
AARP Wisconsin conveyed a message to legislators at budget hearings this spring: The state could save money and help more older people live at home by investing moderate amounts in services for the aging and support for family caregivers. The idea is to reduce reliance on more expensive programs, such as Medicaid-funded nursing home care.
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MADISON, WISCONSIN – With a projected state budget surplus of more than $976 million by mid-2015, AARP Wisconsin was hopeful that Governor Walker – in his State of the State speech – would have placed a greater emphasis on providing long-term relief for those most impacted by the recession.
Helen on WisEye 2
The Grinch had second thoughts before stealing Christmas from Whoville, and we’re hoping our state Senators have a similar change of heart as the deadline nears for them to decide if BadgerCare coverage should begin on the first of the year for about 85,000 low-income adults without dependent children.
Helen Marks Dicks displays BadgerCare button
Wisconsin has the opportunity to make health care available to as many as 211,000 additional Wisconsin residents by 2022.  We can do this by extending Medicaid coverage to most low-income adults not already served by Medicare.  
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