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How to Vote in Michigan’s 2024 Elections

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Important dates and election information

Key dates

  • Presidential primary: Tuesday, Feb. 27
  • State primary: Tuesday, Aug. 6
  • General election: Tuesday, Nov. 5

Voting at a glance

  • Absentee voting: All registered voters can request a no-excuse absentee ballot.
  • Early voting: Starting with the presidential primary on Tuesday, Feb. 27, Michigan will require at least nine days of early voting for statewide and federal elections. Also, Michiganders can vote early and in person by going to their local city or township clerk’s office and filling out an absentee ballot.
  • Voting at the polls: Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Bring an acceptable form of photo ID, such as your driver’s license or U.S. passport. You can fill out additional paperwork at the polls if you forget your ID.

Voting in Michigan

What to know about recent changes

Lawmakers passed a series of changes to election laws in 2023. These include:

  • Allowing at least nine days of early voting for statewide and federal elections, beginning with the presidential primary on Tuesday, Feb. 27. 
  • State funding for drop boxes and prepaid stamps for absentee ballots.
  • Permitting voters to apply just once for absentee ballots for future elections.
  • Requiring city or township clerks to contact voters to correct errors on absentee ballots or ballot applications, such as a missing or mismatched signature.
  • An expanded list of acceptable photo IDs.
  • Redistricting in 2021 changed certain boundaries of some state legislative and U.S. congressional districts. However, in 2023 a three-judge panel ruled that the new maps were unconstitutional and must be redrawn before elections can be held. Check back for updates on this situation. To find your legislative district and polling location, visit Michigan.gov/vote.

Voter registration


Register to vote by mail, in person or online:

  • In person: Go to your local clerk’s office. Bring an acceptable form of ID that proves your residency, like a state driver’s license or a copy of a paycheck stub or utility bill. You can register to vote at your local election clerk’s office until 8 p.m. on Election Day. Use the state’s voter information portal to check if you’re already registered to vote. Voter registration is also offered when you complete a transaction at Secretary of State self-service stations across Michigan. Locate a self-service station here. Also, eligible citizens will be registered to vote automatically anytime they complete a Michigan driver’s license or ID transaction, unless they opt out. Michigan residents between 16 and 17.5 years old can preregister to vote beginning Tuesday, Feb. 13. 
  • Online: If you have a valid Michigan driver’s license or state ID, you can use the state’s voter registration portal to register or check your registration status. Online registration ends 14 days before an election.


Registering to vote on Election Day

You can register to vote on Election Day at your local township or clerk’s office. You will be asked to show proof of residency such as a driver’s license or utility bill.

Primary voting and primary affiliation

Voters participating in the primaries can choose only one party’s ballot. Any voter may participate in a party’s primary election, regardless of that voter’s partisan affiliation.

Americans Head To The Polls To Vote In The 2022 Midterm Elections
Sarah Rice/Getty Images

Ways to vote

Requesting an absentee ballot 

Any registered voter can request a no-excuse absentee ballot. The last day to request an absentee ballot is Friday, Feb. 23, by 5 p.m. by mail and online, and Monday, Feb. 26, by 4 p.m. in person. You can apply for an absentee ballot:

  • By mail: Download, print and complete a ballot application from the state’s voter information portal. Send it to your local election clerk’s office. You can also call your clerk’s office to ask that they mail you a ballot application. The last day to request an absentee ballot by mail is Friday, Feb. 23, by 5 p.m. 
  • In person: Visit your local election clerk’s office to pick up and complete an application or return a completed form you downloaded from the state’s voter information portal. If you are already registered at your current address, you can request an absentee ballot in person at your city or township clerk’s office until 4 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 26.
  • Online: Fill out an absentee ballot request form on the Michigan secretary of state’s website. The last day to request an absentee ballot online is Friday, Feb. 23, by 5 p.m.

Returning your absentee ballot

Return completed ballots by mail or in person. You can return someone else’s ballot if you are their immediate family member, someone who lives in their household, a mail carrier or an authorized election official. Election officials must receive ballots by 8 p.m. on Election Day. Military and overseas ballots postmarked by Election Day will be counted if they are received up to six days after an election.

  • Drop box: Insert your completed and signed absentee ballot into a drop box in your city or township by 8 p.m. on Election Day. Find your clerk’s drop box locations here.

Use the state’s voter portal to track the status of your absentee ballot.

In the event of an emergency, such as an unexpected illness or death in the family, you may be able to request an emergency absentee ballot by contacting your local city or township clerk’s office before 4 p.m. on Election Day.

Voting in person before Election Day 

Starting with the 2024 presidential primary you will have at least nine days — and up to 29 days, depending on where you live — to vote in person before all statewide and federal elections. You’ll be able to cast your ballot at an early voting site, similar to how you would vote on Election Day. Check the Michigan Department of State website for more information on where to vote.

You can also vote early and in person by going to your local election clerk’s office and filling out an absentee ballot.

Voting at the polls on Election Day

Polls are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for all elections. Voters who are in line at their polling location by 8 p.m. on Election Day will be able to vote.

Bring an acceptable form of photo ID, such as your state driver’s license or U.S. passport, to vote on Election Day. Those without ID can fill out additional paperwork at the polls and proceed to vote.

Use the state's voter information portal to find your polling place.

Voter ID requirements on Election Day

An acceptable form of photo ID, such as a state driver’s license or U.S. passport, is required. If you don’t have ID, you can complete paperwork at the polls before voting.

Voting with a disability

Voters with disabilities can vote at home or in person by applying for a standard absentee voter ballot or an accessible voter ballot. Visit your local clerk's office to request an absent voter ballot in person.

Inside the polling location, at least one voting station will be adapted to allow a person to vote while seated. Also, all voters have access to a Voter Assist Terminal in all polling places. Voters can mark their ballots using a touch screen through a Voter Assist Terminal, which marks the ballot but does not tally the votes. Once the ballot is marked, it is counted in the same way as other ballots.

Voters who need assistance in filling out a ballot can receive help from another person, as long as that person is not the voter’s employer or union official. Get more information at the secretary of state’s website.

Voters with disabilities can contact the Michigan Bureau of Elections Ombudsperson for Accessible Elections for help as well.

Voters who have difficulty reading or writing, are visually impaired or have a physical disability that would interfere with the voting process may apply for an accessible electronic absentee ballot which can be completed electronically, printed and returned to the local clerk. To apply online for an accessible electronic absentee ballot, complete this form.

More information about candidates

Key races

  • U.S. President
  • U.S. House: 13 seats
  • U.S. Senate: one seat
  • State House: 110 seats

Sample ballots will be available at the secretary of state’s website.


Editor’s note: This guide was updated on Jan. 4, 2024, with new information about voting in the 2024 presidential primary.

Maura Kelly Lannan is a writer, editor and producer for AARP who covers federal and state policy. She has worked as a reporter for the Associated Press, the Chicago Tribune and the Waterbury, Connecticut Republican-American. She also has written for Bloomberg Government, The Boston Globe and other publications. 


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