Content starts here
CLOSE ×
Search
AARP AARP States Vermont Voters

How to Vote in Vermont’s 2024 Elections

En español

Important dates and election information

Key dates

  • State primary: Tuesday, Aug. 13
  • General election: Tuesday, Nov. 5

Voting at a glance

AARP election buttons final

  • Absentee voting: All registered voters can vote absentee for any reason.
  • Early voting: You can vote early and in person at your town or city clerk’s office starting Saturday, June 29, for the state primary and Saturday, Sept. 21 for the general election.
  • Voting at the polls: You are not required to show ID when you vote at the polls. Check with your town or city clerk’s office for polling hours.

Voting in Vermont

What to know about recent changes

A 2022 new redistricting plan has changed certain boundaries of Vermont’s state legislative districts. Check the secretary of state’s website for information and to find your polling place.

Voter registration

Register by mail, in person or online.

  • By mail: Print a registration form, complete it and mail it to your town or city clerk by Friday, Aug. 9, for the state primary and Friday, Nov. 1, for the general election. Or call your clerk’s office to request that an application be mailed to you. If you are registering for the first time, include a photocopy of an acceptable ID such as a Vermont driver’s license or a current utility bill that lists your address.
  • In person: Go to your town or city clerk’s office during normal business hours until Monday, Aug. 12, for the state primary and Monday, Nov. 4, for the general election, or register at the polls on Election Day. 
Voters In Super Tuesday States Cast Their Ballots
Voters cast ballots on Election Day in Ferrisburgh.
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

  • Online: Go to My Voter Page, the state’s online voter portal, to register. If you’re a first-time voter, you must provide a photocopy of an acceptable form of ID, such as a driver’s license or current utility bill that lists your address. You can register up to and on Election Day. You are encouraged to register by Friday, Aug. 9, for the state primary and Friday, Nov. 1, for the general election to ensure your name appears on the state’s voter checklist.

First-time voters must take the voter’s oath that says you will vote your conscience and not let anyone tell you how to vote. If your name is not on the state’s voter checklist when you arrive at your polling location, you may be asked to fill out additional paperwork. Use the state’s voter portal or call your town or city clerk to check your registration status.

Registering to vote on Election Day

You can register to vote at your polling place on Election Day.

Primary voting and party affiliation

Voters do not register with a party in Vermont, so they can choose the primary in which they want to vote. But you can only vote in one party's primary.

You will be given a ballot for each of the major parties when you vote during the primary. You mark one of the ballots and put the remaining unvoted ballots into a discard bin.

Ways to vote

Requesting an absentee ballot 

Any registered voter can request an absentee ballot at any time during the year, but you must renew your request each year.

Absentee ballot requests must be received by 5 p.m. or by the close of the town clerk’s office on Monday, Aug.12, for the state primary and Monday, Nov. 4, for the general election.
If you are ill, injured or have a disability, you can have a ballot delivered to your home on Election Day and submitted for you. Contact your town or city clerk’s office for details.

Returning your absentee ballot

Place your completed ballot inside the voted ballot envelope and sign the certificate on the outside of the envelope. Return the sealed envelope by mail or in person:

  • By mail: Mail your pre-addressed ballot to your town or city clerk’s office. It must be received by the close of business on Monday, Aug.12, for the state primary and Monday, Nov. 4, for the general election. State officials recommend mailing your ballot at least one week before an election.
  • In person: Hand-deliver your ballot to your town or city clerk’s office or a drop box location, if available, by close of business on Monday, Aug.12, for the state primary and Monday, Nov. 4, for the general election. Or bring it to the polls by 7 p.m. on Election Day.

Enter your information at My Voter Page to track your ballot. Voters can correct a ballot if the clerk finds an error, such as a missing signature. The clerk will notify you if your ballot was returned incorrectly.

Voting in person before Election Day

You can vote early and in person at your town or city clerk’s office during normal office hours starting Saturday, June 29, for the state primary and Saturday, Sept. 21, for the general election. Early voting ends the day before an election.

Once you vote, place your completed ballot inside the voted ballot envelope and sign the certificate on the outside of the envelope. Return the ballot in the sealed envelope to the town or city clerk.

Voting at the polls on Election Day

Check with your city or town clerk for polling hours, which vary, and use the My Voter Page or this interactive map to find your polling location. All polling locations must be open by 10 a.m. and closed by 7 p.m.

Voter ID requirements on Election Day

You don’t need ID to vote at the polls, but you do need to include a photocopy of an acceptable form of ID when you register by mail or online. If you don’t include a photocopy, you will be asked to show an acceptable form of ID at the polling place before you vote.

Voting with a disability 

You can bring someone to help you vote on Election Day, but that person cannot be your employer or from your union. You can also ask an election official to bring a ballot to your car.

Voters who are ill or have a disability can ask that an absentee ballot be delivered to them by two justices of the peace.

Vermont uses an accessible ballot marking device for those who ask to receive their absentee ballot electronically. It also is available at each polling place. The tablet-based system marks a voter’s choices onto the same paper ballots used by all voters at the polls. More information is available on the secretary of state's website.

More information about candidates

Key races

  • U.S. President
  • Governor
  • U.S. House: one seat
  • U.S. Senate: one seat
  • State House: 150 seats 
  • State Senate: 30 seats

Sample ballots will be available on the secretary of state’s website.

Editor’s note: This guide was originally published Jan. 24, 2024, and has been updated with new information about voting in the 2024 elections.

Maura Kelly Lannan is a writer, editor and producer for AARP who covers federal and state policy. She has worked as a reporter for the Associated Press, the Chicago Tribune and the Waterbury, Connecticut, Republican-American. She also has written for Bloomberg Government, The Boston Globe and other publications. 

Also of Interest:

About AARP Vermont
Contact information and more from your state office. Learn what we are doing to champion social change and help you live your best life.