Content starts here
CLOSE ×
Search
AARP AARP States Hawaii Voters

How to Vote in Hawai‘i’s 2024 Elections

Important dates and election information

Key dates

  • Democratic caucus: Wednesday, March 6, in person only
  • Republican caucus: Tuesday, March 12, in person only
  • State primary: Saturday, Aug. 10
  • General election: Tuesday, Nov. 5
An attendant helps a driver drop off a ballot on Election Day in Honolulu.
An attendant helps a driver drop off a ballot on Election Day in Honolulu.

Voting at a glance

Democratic caucus: In-person voting will be Wednesday, March 6, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Check the state’s Democratic Party website for locations. No ID is needed to vote.

Republican caucus: In-person voting is available Tuesday, March 12, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Bring a photo ID. Caucus locations and information about registration and membership cards can be found on the Republican Party’s website.

State primary 

  • Mail-in voting: Every registered voter in Hawai‘i automatically receives a ballot in the mail.
  • Early voting: Cast your ballot at any voter service center in your county from Monday, July 29, through Saturday, Aug. 10.
  • Voting at the polls: Hawai‘i votes mostly by mail, but some voter service centers are open on Election Day for walk-in voting and same-day registration.

Voting in Hawai‘i

What to know about recent changes


A 2022 redistricting plan changed the boundaries of U.S. congressional and some legislative districts, and may affect which candidates appear on your ballot. Check the state election website for more information.

Voter registration

For the Democratic and Republican caucuses and state primary, you must be registered to vote.

  • By mail: Complete a voter registration application and send it to your county elections division by 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, July 31, for the state primary. Applications must be postmarked by July 31. If you can’t download the application, call the state Office of Elections at 808-453-8683 or email elections@hawaii.gov to request a paper copy. You can also pick up an application at U.S. post offices, state libraries and most state agencies. 
  • In person: Visit a voter service center where you can register or update your registration and then vote on the same day for the state primary. Check the state elections website starting in May for locations and hours. Or go to your county elections division or the state Office of Elections to register. You can also register to vote when completing an application for a driver’s license or state ID at the Department of Motor Vehicles or when applying for certain public assistance programs.
  • Online: Sign in to Hawai‘i’s online voter registration system. You must have a Hawai‘i driver’s license or state ID card and a Social Security number to access the system. You can register online at any time before or on Saturday, Aug.10.

If you don’t have a Hawai‘i driver’s license, state ID card or a Social Security number, you can still register to vote by mail or in person, although first-time voters registering by mail without these must provide proof of identification. Acceptable proof of identification includes a current photo ID card or a current bank statement, utility bill, paycheck or government document showing your name and address.

County elections divisions will mail notices of voter registration to voters prior to the primary.

Lahaina voters affected by the 2023 wildfires should update their voter registration information with their current mailing address to ensure they receive a ballot.

Registering to vote on Election Day

Voter registration is available at the Democratic caucus on Wednesday, March 6, and on Tuesday, March 12, at the Republican caucus. Photo ID is required to register at the Republican caucus.

You can register to vote at a voter service center on Saturday, Aug. 10, for the state primary. Check the state elections website starting in May for locations and hours of voter service centers. ID is not required, but state elections officials encourage you to bring identification because it might speed up the registration process.

Primary voting and party affiliation

Hawai‘i voters do not affiliate with a political party when they register to vote. If you want to vote in a party’s caucus, you must become a member of that political party. Contact the party to join. Information on parties can be found on the state elections website.

For the Democratic caucus, voters who want to participate can join the party online through hawaiidemocrats.org/join. Or you can request a paper form by emailing aloha@hawaiidemocrats.org. You also can mail a request for the paper form to P.O. Box 2041, Honolulu, HI 96805 or ask for the paper form in person at the Democratic Party of Hawai‘i Headquarters, 627 South St., Suite 105, Honolulu, HI 96813.

Voters who want to vote in the Republican caucus can join online. They also need to complete a membership card at the caucus. You can download this card, print it, complete it and bring it with you to the caucus.

For the state primary, voters will receive a ballot with candidates from all political parties on it. Voters must choose a political party preference and may cast votes only for candidates from that party. If you vote for candidates from different parties, your vote will not count.

Ways to vote

Requesting an absentee ballot

Absentee ballots are not used for the Democratic and Republican caucuses.

Every registered voter will automatically receive a ballot in the mail no later than Tuesday, July 23, for the state primary. If you do not receive your ballot, contact your county elections division.

If you are temporarily away from home and need your ballot sent to a different mailing address, you can submit an absentee ballot application by mail or in person to have a ballot sent to a different address by Saturday, Aug. 3.

  • By mail: Download a copy of the application. You also can call the state Office of Elections at 808-453-8683 or email elections@hawaii.gov to request a mailed copy of the application.

Returning your ballot

Complete your ballot for the state primary and sign your return envelope. Election officials will verify your signature against the signature on file with your voter registration. If a ballot is returned without a signature, you will be contacted to correct this. A ballot cannot be counted without your signature on the return envelope.

Once you receive and complete your ballot, you can return it by mail or in person.

  • By mail: Send it to your county elections division using the prepaid, preaddressed envelope included in your ballot packet. Ballots must be received (not postmarked) by 7 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 10, for the state primary.
  • In person: Return it to a voter service center in your county by 7 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 10, for the state primary. Locations can be found at the state elections website in May.

Sign up at BallotTrax or contact your county elections division to check on the status of your ballot. If there is a problem with your ballot, such as a signature that doesn’t match the one associated with your voter registration record, BallotTrax will notify you that there was an issue processing your ballot. Contact your county elections division to correct the issue. You also will be contacted by your county elections division and be given up to five days to make a correction.

Voting in person before Election Day

Voter service centers will be open starting Monday, July 29, for same-day registration, accessible voting and for those who prefer to vote in person for the state primary. Check the state elections website starting in May for locations and hours.

Voting at the polls on Election Day

Because Hawai‘i’s elections are mostly by mail, no precinct polling places will be open for the state primary, but some voter service centers will be open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Check the state elections website starting in May for available locations.

For the Republican caucus, voters can cast a provisional ballot in person at any state caucus location if they cannot make it to one in their home district. Voters cast a paper ballot.

Voters will cast a paper ballot at the Democratic caucus.

Voter ID requirements on Election Day 

Identification is not required at voter service centers for the state primary, but state officials encourage you to bring ID so that the check-in process goes faster.

For the Republican caucus, a Hawai‘i driver’s license, state ID or other government-issued photo ID must be shown by all voters.

Voting with a disability

If you’re a state primary voter with special needs, you can request an electronic ballot on your voter registration or absentee application or by contacting your county elections division.

State primary voters may also use accessible voting equipment at voter service centers. More information is available on the state elections website.

More information about candidates

Key races:

  • U.S. President
  • U.S. House: two seats
  • U.S. Senate: one seat
  • State House: 51 seats 
  • State Senate: 13 seats  

Sample ballots will be available at the state elections website.

Editor’s note: This guide was originally published Jan. 29, 2024, and has been updated with new information about voting in the 2024 elections.

Maura Kelly Lannan is a writer, editor and producer for AARP who covers federal and state policy. She has worked as a reporter for the Associated Press, the Chicago Tribune and the Waterbury, Connecticut Republican-American. She also has written for Bloomberg Government, The Boston Globe and other publications. 

Also of Interest:

About AARP Hawaii
Contact information and more from your state office. Learn what we are doing to champion social change and help you live your best life.