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How to Vote in Washington, D.C.’s 2024 Elections

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Important dates and election information

Key dates

  • Republican presidential primary: Friday, March 1, to Sunday, March 3
  • D.C. primary: Tuesday, June 4
  • General election: Tuesday, Nov. 5
2022 U.S. Midterm Elections

Voting at a glance

  • Mail-in voting: All active, registered voters will be sent a no-excuse mail-in ballot for the D.C. primary. There is no mail-in voting for the Republican presidential primary.
  • Early voting: Cast your ballot early and in person at least one week before the D.C. primary at vote centers throughout the city. There is no early voting for the Republican presidential primary.
  • Vote centers: Find locations on the D.C. Board of Elections website. The Republican presidential primary will be held at the Madison Hotel, 1177 15th St., NW, Washington, DC 20005.

Voting in Washington, D.C.

What to know about recent changes

Qualified noncitizens can now vote in D.C. elections for local offices. Noncitizens cannot vote for federal offices. Check the D.C. Board of Elections website for more information and details on how to register to vote.

Voter registration

Register to vote by mail, fax, email, in person and online for the D.C. primary.

  • By mail: Download an application from the D.C. Board of Elections website, print and complete it, and mail it to the D.C. Board of Elections at 1015 Half St. SE, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20003. The mailed application must be received by Tuesday, May 14.
  • By fax or email: Fax your application to 202-347-2648, or email a scanned version or a picture of your application to DCRegistrations@dcboe.org
  • Online: Use the District’s online portal to register by Tuesday, May 14. You also can check your registration status or update your name, address and party affiliation.

Those registering to vote for the first time and submitting an application by mail or online should include a copy of a valid photo ID, recent utility bill or other government document with your name and address. Check the D.C. Board of Elections website for a list of acceptable IDs.

Register by 5 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 16, to vote and affiliate with the Republican Party if you want to participate in the Republican presidential primary.

Registering to vote on Election Day

Same-day registration is available at early vote centers during the early voting period or on Tuesday, June 4, for the D.C. primary. You must bring proof of residence, such as your driver’s license, U.S. passport or a current utility bill. Check the D.C. Board of Elections website for a list of acceptable IDs.

No same-day registration will be available at the Republican presidential primary.

Primary voting and party affiliation

You must be affiliated with one of D.C.’s parties that are eligible to conduct a primary (Democratic, Republican or D.C. Statehood Green) to vote in that party’s primary election.

The deadline to register to vote and affiliate with a party is Tuesday, May 14, for the D.C. primary, unless you are registering for the first time when you vote. In that situation, you can register with a party when you vote.

You can also vote in the D.C. primary if you register on the same day as the Tuesday, June 4, primary and affiliate with an approved party.

You must be registered to vote and affiliated with the Republican Party by 5 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 16, to vote in its presidential primary.

Ways to vote

Requesting a mail-in ballot

All registered voters will be mailed a no-excuse mail-in ballot for the D.C. primary. Those who will be away from home during the election period can request a ballot be sent to a different address. To request a mail-in ballot be sent to a different address:

  • By mail or phone:  Download and complete a mail-in ballot request application, sign it, and return it to the D.C. Board of Elections by mail or by fax at 202-347-2648. You may also email your application as a scanned attachment to DCabsentee@dcboe.org. Call the D.C. Board of Elections office at 202-727-2525 to request that an application be mailed to you.
  • In person: Request a mail-in ballot at the D.C. Board of Elections office at 1015 Half St. SE, Suite 750, Washington, DC 20003.

The deadline to request a mail-in ballot be sent to a different address is Monday, May 20, for the primary and Monday, Oct. 21, for the general election.

No mail-in ballots will be used for the Republican primary.

Returning your mail-in ballot

Refold your completed ballot and place it inside the “secrecy sleeve.” Note that the secrecy sleeve is wider than the refolded ballot, so do not fold the refolded ballot again to make it fit. Place the secrecy sleeve inside the postage-paid return ballot envelope. Sign and date the voter’s oath on the back of the return ballot envelope. Seal the return ballot envelope.

  • By mail: Mail your completed ballot to the address on the envelope. Your completed ballot for the D.C. primary must be postmarked on or before Tuesday, June 4, and must arrive at the D.C. Board of Elections office by Friday, June 14. For the general election, your completed ballot must be postmarked on or before Tuesday, Nov. 5, and must arrive at the D.C. Board of Elections office by Friday, Nov. 15.
  • In person: Return your completed ballot to a vote center by 8 p.m. on Tuesday, June 4, for the D.C. primary and by 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 5, for the general election.
  • Drop box: Place your completed ballot in a drop box by 8 p.m. on Tuesday, June 4, for the D.C. primary and by 8 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 5, for the general election.

If you are a first-time voter who registered by mail or online, you must include a copy of one acceptable ID document with your completed mail ballot. Place a copy of the ID document inside the return ballot envelope. If you don’t provide a copy of your ID document, your ballot will be treated as a special ballot and will not be counted unless you submit a copy of your ID to the Board of Elections.

Use the D.C. Board of Elections online tracker to check the status of your ballot.

Voting in person before Election Day

Early voting for the D.C. primary will be held Sunday, May 26, to Sunday, June 2. Early vote centers will be closed on Monday, May 27, for Memorial Day.

Early voting for the general election will be held Monday, Oct. 28, to Sunday, Nov. 3.

Find a list of early vote centers on the D.C. Board of Elections website or here.

Early vote centers are open from 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

No early voting will be held for the Republican presidential primary.

Voting on Election Day

Vote centers are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. for the D.C. primary held on Tuesday, June 4. Search for your vote center on the D.C. Board of Elections website or here.

Voting times for the Republican presidential primary are not available yet. Check back on the D.C. Republican Party’s website for updated information.

Voter ID requirements on Election Day

If you registered to vote in D.C. for the first time and submitted your voter registration application by mail or electronically, you may be required to show a copy of an acceptable ID document that includes your name and current address the first time that you vote.For the Republican presidential primary, you must show a state-issued photo ID that includes your name and date of birth. Those two items must match the information shown on your voter registration with the D.C. Board of Elections.

Voting with a disability

You can bring someone to the polls to help you vote, but that person cannot be your employer or from your union.

You can vote in person using accessible touch screen voting equipment. The ExpressVote ballot marking system allows voters to have their ballot read to them and use a touch screen to mark a ballot.

If you have difficulty entering a voting center, you can vote from your car at all vote center locations.

You also can request an accessible mail-in ballot that you can complete online, print and return by mail, drop box or vote center. To request to use the Accessible Remote Ballot Marking System, complete a form available on the D.C. Board of Elections website, where you also can learn more about the system.

More information about candidates

Key races

  • U.S. President
  • Delegate to the U.S. House: one seat

Sample ballots will be available at the D.C. Board of Elections website.

Editor’s note: This guide was updated on Jan. 30, 2024, with new information about voting in the 2024 presidential primary.

Maura Kelly Lannan is a writer, editor and producer for AARP who covers federal and state policy. She has worked as a reporter for the Associated Press, the Chicago Tribune and the Waterbury, Connecticut Republican-American. She also has written for Bloomberg Government, The Boston Globe and other publications. 

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