Just about everyone wants their community to be “livable.” But what does that mean exactly? AARP defines it as a community that is built for people of all ages. The formula for what makes a community livable is not complex, but there are nuances that help create a people-friendly environment, one that is safe and accessible and is a great place to live. With that in mind, test your knowledge about livability. If you picked up a questions sheet at a local event, you’ll find the answers below.

1.) What percentage of people wants to stay in their own homes as they age?

A. 99%

B. 85%

C. 35%

 

2.)  Most Americans drive on all their trips — even to the closest destinations. Half of all these trips are:

A. 3 miles or less

B. More than 10 miles

C. 5 miles

 

3.) What percent of Americans say they would ride a bicycle if they felt safe doing so?

A. 30%

B. 15%

C. 60%

 

3.) When the topic is land use, what word is generally defined as the amount of residential development permitted on a given parcel of land

A. Urban crowding

B. Livability

C. Density

 

4.) Bicycle infrastructure creates an average of how many jobs for every $1 million spent?

A. None

B. 11.4

C. 5.5

 

5.) What percentage of people wants to stay in their own homes as they age?

A. 99%

B. 85%

C. 35%

 

6.) Most Americans drive on all their trips — even to the closest destinations. Half of all these trips are:

A. 3 miles or less

B. More than 10 miles

C. 5 miles

 

7.) What percent of Americans say they would ride a bicycle if they felt safe doing so?

A. 30%

B. 15%

C. 60%

 

8.) When the topic is land use, what word is generally defined as the amount of residential development permitted on a given parcel of land

A. Urban crowding

B. Livability

C. Density

 

9.) Bicycle infrastructure creates an average of how many jobs for every $1 million spent?

A. None

B. 11.4

C. 5.5

 

Source: www.aarp.org/livable

 

Answers:

1.) An AARP survey shows that 85 percent of people would like to stay in their own homes as they age, for as long as they can. 

 2.) Half of all trips taken in the United States are three miles or less, yet most Americans drive — even to the closest destinations. The popularity of bicycling has been on the rise. The number of bike trips doubled between 1990 and 2009.

3.)According to the U.S. Dept. of Transportation 60 percent of Americans would ride a bicycle if they felt safe doing so, and eight out of 10 agree that bicycling is a healthy, positive activity.

4.) When the topic is land use, the word “density” is generally defined as the amount of residential development permitted on a given parcel of land. The larger the number of housing units per acre, the higher the density; the fewer units, the lower the density.

 

 5.)  A more balanced transportation system saves and earns money. For instance, bicycle infrastructure creates an average of 11.4 jobs for every $1 million spent while road only projects create 7.8 jobs per $1 million.7 After slowing traffic and improving bicycling on Valencia Street in San Francisco’s Mission District, nearby businesses saw sales increase by 60 percent, which merchants attributed to increased pedestrian and bicycle activity.

 6.) Roundabouts, which can be installed on virtually any size street, range from single-lane mini-roundabouts to two lanes or more. A single-lane roundabout can be as narrow as 80 feet in diameter, measuring across the circle from the outside edges of the vehicle lanes. Also, a well-placed roundabout can keep a road from needing to be widened, saving up to $10 million dollars per mile in land and construction costs.

7.) According to Geology.com there are 238 waterfalls in Oregon.

8.) Cars sit unused 95 percent of the time, and although motorists park for free in 99 percent of the places they go, the costs for the parking is being incurred by businesses and government. In three out of 10 car rides to nearby destinations, studies show that drivers spend three to eight minutes looking for a parking spot.

9.) The U.S. Forest Service estimates that the presence of street trees increases adjacent home values by an average of $13,000.

 10.) The World Health Organization launched the Network of Age-Friendly Communities in 2006. AARP became an affiliate in the United States for this effort in 2012.

 

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