AARP AARP States Colorado Scams & Fraud

Avoid IRS Scams

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Scammers posing as IRS agents or Treasury Department officials are continuing their deceptive ways. First and foremost, it is important to remember the IRS will first contact you through the mail. If you receive a phone call or suspicious email or text from the IRS, chances are it’s a scammer posing as an IRS agent. Are you still unsure? Here are some red flags that the call, email or text you received is not really the IRS:

If the call was…

  • Aggressive, threatening or offensive
  • Requiring immediate payment via wire transfer, credit card, prepaid debit card or gift card
  • Threatening to involve local police or judges to have you arrested

If the email or text was…

  • Asking for information related to refunds, filing status, confirming personal information, ordering transcripts or verifying PIN information
  • Asking you to update important information via a hyperlink

If you receive a scam call, hang up immediately and report the call to the IRS at 800-366-4484 or www.tigta.gov. If you receive an email, forward it to the IRS at phishing@irs.gov, and then delete it. If you have any questions or concerns don’t hesitate to call an AARP Foundation ElderWatch volunteer specialist at  800-222-4444 (Denver Metro Area 303-222-4444) to help you verify that the call, email or text you received was indeed a scam.

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