Scams & Fraud

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Sign up for this webinar to learn what kinds of census scams are out there and how to report them.
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Thirty-two Westminster Canterbury residents gathered over coffee on Thursday, February 27, to learn how to protect themselves from fraud. Chris Lloyd, from the AARP Virginia Speakers Bureau gave everyone some practical advice on how to both recognize and prevent fraud.
Fake phone fraud
They may contact you by phone. Or online. They may even come right to your front door.
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One of the most common scams is government impostors, where you may get a phone call, an email, or a visit to your home from someone claiming to be from the Social Security Administration, the Internal Revenue Service or some other government agency. In fact, the Federal Trade Commission recently reported victims lost nearly $153 million to government impostor scams in 2019 – a staggering amount.
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They pretend to be IRS agents or Census officials, someone on a dating site or even your grandchild telling you they’re in trouble. They’re impostor scammers—and they’re after YOUR money and YOUR personal information.
Stressed Hispanic couple paying bills on laptop
Winter is upon us, with temperatures plummeting in many areas, keeping the heat on is critical—, and scammers try to take advantage of the situation. Each winter, utility scams spike as con artists claiming to be from the utility company threaten to cut off service if an immediate payment isn’t made.
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The holidays may be over, but Porch Pirate season never ends. While at-home deliveries are at their highest over the holiday season, direct-to-home shopping happens every day around the country.
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If you’re like a lot of Americans, you spent a lot this holiday season and you might be in the mood to tackle your debt in the New Year. Getting yourself out of debt is hard work. It takes time and discipline.
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It’s New Year’s Resolution time. It’s time to make a commitment to be fraud aware in 2020. For the next 52 weeks, like clockwork, scammers will be on the prowl looking to steal our money or sensitive information. While there is no way to stop these attempts from happening, we can all take steps to make sure we don’t fall victim. Remember the basics: only share sensitive information when needed with people who you know and trust – like your doctor. Don’t click on web links from untrusted emailers, and if someone asks you to make a payment using a gift card, it is a scam.
Beware of holiday scams!
Give carefully; 'tis the season for fraud. During this time of charitable giving and online shopping, scammers are looking for opportunities to steal money, goods and identities.
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