Community

Virginia primary voting - Alexandria, VA
All registered voters may vote absentee by mail, but you must apply to do so
IMG_20210415_154154646 (1).jpg
It’s been a year since Dean died.  His wife Maggie, now ninety-one, took some time for herself this week to remember her husband and the good times they had. They were married for twenty-two years; each had been married before and had (adult) children by the time they met – at a square dance in 1996.
NPG-NPG_81_M1Lincoln2L_d1.jpg
AARP Virginia's recent Tuesday Explorers event featured a virtual tour of the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, D.C.
Baby Red Panda
The Virginia Treasures series recently highlighted the Virginia Zoo in Norfolk.
Man with Spinal Cord Injury entering his accessible van
Five of Virginia's Area Agencies on Aging are offering free rides to get the vaccine.
AARP Logo with state logos in background
Starting more than 30 years ago to provide AIDS services for women and children, the LGBT Life Center in Norfolk, Virginia, continues their initial goal.
Trailer 1.jpg
The Farmville Area Habitat for Humanity was one of 89 national winners of the AARP Community Challenge Grant in 2017, receiving $6,000.
Moton-Live-Logo-2021-web-small.png
April 23, 2021, the ‘eyes of the world’ again were focused on Moton as history was made again. During a 10-hour virtual celebration, the audience heard from voices around the country. The audience heard conversation segments from civic leaders, museum leaders, educators and those foundational to the birth and growth of Moton Museum over the years.
Richard Bell-Thai Nguyen.jpg
In his book Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and Their Astonishing Odyssey Home, University of Maryland historian Dr. Richard Bell recounts the harrowing tale of these boys, including their escape to freedom. On April 28, 2021, during an Osher Lifetime Learning Institute (OLLI) virtual lecture, Bell used the saga of the boys as an example to educate listeners about the Reverse Underground Railroad. This OLLI lecture was one of a series of free events presented in collaboration with AARP Virginia and George Mason University.
James Fort.png
Today, most of us think about Jamestown as the first successful English colony in America, and the fort where its first residents struggled to survive. However, this is just a part of the Jamestown story. This webinar, the third in AARP’s Virginia Treasures Series, examines the events starting in 1619 that brought the first documented Africans to Virginia and marked the beginning of slavery in English North America.
Search AARP Virginia