Scams & Fraud

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Scammers are using heightened fear and anxiety due to the coronavirus and the recent social unrest to target unsuspecting individuals—stealing money or sensitive personal information. You can protect yourself and your loved ones if you know what scams you should be aware of.
Scam
Nearly 1 in 3 Oklahoma residents surveyed by AARP have been targeted by a con artist pretending to represent a government agency.
Hoodwinked Series
AARP Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Insurance Department, Oklahoma Department of Securities, the Oklahoma Attorney General’s Office and the Oklahoma Banker’s Association will present a four-part fraud prevention webinar series. Topics include Medicare and healthcare fraud prevention, as well as information on relationship scams, cyber scams, investment, banking and securities fraud.
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You never know when you could find yourself in charge of a loved one’s care. From a catastrophic injury to a sudden decline in health, their life changes can dramatically alter yours too.
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You’ve earned a right to Social Security benefits, but have you ever wondered how it all works? Join our free webinar where we’ll explore these questions to help you get more out of Social Security.
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Sign up for this webinar to learn what kinds of census scams are out there and how to report them.
protect yourself from fraud!
Learn to identify scams and avoid becoming a con artist’s victim by participating in AARP Oklahoma’s fraud prevention telephone town hall on Thursday, March 12, at 10 a.m.
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One of the most common scams is government impostors, where you may get a phone call, an email, or a visit to your home from someone claiming to be from the Social Security Administration, the Internal Revenue Service or some other government agency. In fact, the Federal Trade Commission recently reported victims lost nearly $153 million to government impostor scams in 2019 – a staggering amount.
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They pretend to be IRS agents or Census officials, someone on a dating site or even your grandchild telling you they’re in trouble. They’re impostor scammers—and they’re after YOUR money and YOUR personal information.
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The biggest shopping season of the year is, unfortunately, also the biggest scamming season. Criminals are out in force during the holidays trying to steal your money and personal information. Learn about ways to help protect you and your loved ones.
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