Scams & Fraud

brett johnson.png
Deep within the internet is the Dark Web, a space where criminals can anonymously buy and sell illegal goods and private information. Known as the “Internet Godfather,” Brett Johnson created one of the dark web’s first online stores where criminals and scammers bought stolen credit cards, Social Security numbers, drugs and guns. Eventually, he was caught and convicted. Now, after serving seven years in prison, Brett works to stop criminal enterprise and consults for the Secret Service and the cybersecurity industry.
Letters on old wooden blocks (fact, fiction)
Do you believe everything you see online?
Coffee Conversation with Sunny Mulligan.png
Grab your morning beverage of choice and join AARP NH for a unique, live 30-minute Coffee & Conversation with Sunny Mulligan Shea, an attorney and victim witness advocate with the Elder Abuse and Exploitation Unit of the New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office, and AARP New Hampshire host Jeannie Tucker.
US quarantine, 100 dollar banknote with medical mask. The concept of epidemic and protection against coronavrius.
Attorney General Gordon J. MacDonald urges all of New Hampshire’s aging adults to be aware of and to take steps to protect themselves from scams related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, all people are encouraged to assist aging adults in protecting themselves from scams to the fullest and safest extent possible.
coronavirus.jfif
Scammers work hard to get us in a heightened emotional state where decision-making is compromised. Con artists refer to this as getting their targets “under the ether.”
Scam alert conceptual traffic sign and stormy sky
Attorney General Gordon J. MacDonald urges Granite Staters to be on the alert for charitable giving and consumer product scams related to the COVID-19 outbreak. Scammers may take advantage of fears related to COVID-19 outbreak by selling bogus “treatment” and “prevention” products, establishing fake charities, and sending seemingly legitimate emails with malicious links or attachments.
AARP Logo with state logos in background
Scammers look to capitalize on the news of the moment, especially if the headlines can instill fear and motivate people to act. The ongoing outbreak of the coronavirus is no exception. While scientists and medical professionals are working overtime to find ways to test for and stem the spread of the virus, the Federal Trade Commission warns that bad actors are working hard to use this as an opportunity to deceive consumers and steal their money or sensitive information.
US quarantine, 100 dollar banknote with medical mask. The concept of epidemic and protection against coronavrius.
Be wary of people pushing products or stocks that promise a cure
Search AARP New Hampshire