Scams & Fraud

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Sign up for this webinar to learn what kinds of census scams are out there and how to report them.
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Scammers work hard to get us in a heightened emotional state where decision-making is compromised. Con artists refer to this as getting their targets “under the ether.”
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Attorney General Gordon J. MacDonald urges Granite Staters to be on the alert for charitable giving and consumer product scams related to the COVID-19 outbreak. Scammers may take advantage of fears related to COVID-19 outbreak by selling bogus “treatment” and “prevention” products, establishing fake charities, and sending seemingly legitimate emails with malicious links or attachments.
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Scammers look to capitalize on the news of the moment, especially if the headlines can instill fear and motivate people to act. The ongoing outbreak of the coronavirus is no exception. While scientists and medical professionals are working overtime to find ways to test for and stem the spread of the virus, the Federal Trade Commission warns that bad actors are working hard to use this as an opportunity to deceive consumers and steal their money or sensitive information.
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Be wary of people pushing products or stocks that promise a cure
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Attorney General Gordon J. MacDonald announces “Slam the Scam” Day on March 5, 2020 as part of the Federal Trade Commission’s National Consumer Protection Week which runs March 1-7, 2020.
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One of the most common scams is government impostors, where you may get a phone call, an email, or a visit to your home from someone claiming to be from the Social Security Administration, the Internal Revenue Service or some other government agency. In fact, the Federal Trade Commission recently reported victims lost nearly $153 million to government impostor scams in 2019 – a staggering amount.
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What tricks do con artists use to steal your money? How can you outsmart scammers before they strike? Beat the con artists at their game. Check out these scam alerts and don’t get duped.
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They pretend to be IRS agents or Census officials, someone on a dating site or even your grandchild telling you they’re in trouble. They’re impostor scammers—and they’re after YOUR money and YOUR personal information.
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Con artists don’t care how hard you worked. Stay informed to stay protected!
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