Advocacy

Stay up-to-date on federal and state legislative activities. Learn how AARP is fighting for you in Washington D.C. and right here at home.
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RALEIGH -- As the North Carolina Serious Illness Coalition (NCSI Coalition) approaches the end of its second year, COVID has provided an important catalyst for more than 160 members and 85 organizations coming together with the common goal of improving the lives of the seriously ill and their caregivers. AARP North Carolina has been an instrumental part of the Coalition's efforts.
healthy living
By 2029, every fifth North Carolinian will be 65 or older. By 2031, there will be more people 65 and older than there will be children. AARP North Carolina is working to ensure the state is prepared for this. It is a member of the newly created Task Force on Healthy Aging, a project of the North Carolina Institute of Medicine. 
Doctor greeting couple in hospital
RALEIGH – If the NC House of Representatives acts in the Short Session, state lawmakers will make substantial progress when it comes to improving both the access and affordability of health care in the state.  Following many years exploring healthcare policy changes and a recent bipartisan Joint Legislative Study Committee on Access to Healthcare and Medicaid Expansion, the state Senate passed HB 149 with bipartisan and near unanimous (by one vote) support.
Group of multiracial seniors on porch swing
RALEIGH -- May is Older Americans Month and the state budget proposed by Governor Roy Cooper reflects some of the important needs of our growing population of older adults.  Many will credit an added focus on aging to North Carolina’s changing demographics where there will soon be more older residents than young.
Keyboard with key for Retirement planning
North Carolina is facing a retirement savings crisis that will leave far too many residents barely able to afford their basic needs in their later years.
On the go
COVID-19 has delivered a grim reminder of the serious and chronic issues residents and staff in nursing homes face.  But long before the pandemic, many of these facilities were cited frequently for problems such as poor infection control, understaffing, inappropriate discharges and more.
Crowd of people standing together
RALEIGH -- For several years, AARP members and other advocates working to support the needs of older adults in North Carolina have been calling on state lawmakers to make necessary investments to help meet the needs of the state’s fastest growing segment of the population – adults ages 60 and older.
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Legislation would increase the Medicaid pay rate for the 120,000 direct care workers across North Carolina, who include those at nursing homes, group homes and residential behavioral health facilities, and home health aides. 
Senior African American businessman reviews document with colleagues
NC Work and Save is the easiest way workers can save more for retirement
caregiving
The need to support our long-term care system, as well as home and community-based care, goes hand in hand with North Carolina’s quickly aging population. By the year 2025, one in every five state residents will be age 65 and older.
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