Livable Communities

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Come get inspired! Find out from local and national leaders how to make communities more livable for people of all ages.
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RALEIGH, NC— AARP North Carolina announced seven organizations will receive 2021 Community Challenge grants – part of the largest group of grantees to date with $3.2 million awarded among 244 organizations nationwide. Grantees will implement quick-action projects to promote livable communities by improving housing, transportation, public spaces, civic engagement, and connection with family, friends, and neighbors with an emphasis on the needs of the 50-plus. Many of this year’s awards support revitalizing communities adversely impacted by the pandemic and include a focus on diversity, inclusion, and disparities.
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ASHEVILLE, NC -- With summer in full swing, you may be looking for ways to tiptoe back to normalcy after a tough year of COVID. You would probably prefer to continue staying outdoors as much as possible and avoid big crowds. Here is a sampling of possibilities from our partners around the Western North Carolina region, each chosen to highlight one of the eight domains of livability for residents of ages.
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WINSTON-SALEM, NC -- Residents and visitors to Winston-Salem now have a new place to play, gather and exercise, thanks to the new AARP Sponsored Outdoor Fitness Park Organized by FitLot opening in Miller Park on Queen Street.
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ASHEVILLE -- Broadway Street, in downtown Asheville, follows an ancient Native American trade route , so it is entirely fitting that a new kind of outdoor meeting place will be coming to this street in 2021. The Center for Craft is working in collaboration with members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (ECBI) to create a public art parklet “to preserve and advance the important craft legacy of western North Carolina.”
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ASHEVILLE -- Accessory Dwelling Units — commonly known as backyard bungalows, garage apartments and so-called granny flats — are small homes that exist on the same property lot as a single-family residence. Not only are these housing options important for family caregivers who want their loved ones to live nearby, their popularity is growing in crowded urban areas where land is scarce and expensive.
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AARP recognizes social isolation as a critical health issue for seniors. While staying at home and practicing social distancing to slow the spread of COVID, many seniors are finding themselves more isolated than ever before. That is why AARP North Carolina is focusing on some efforts being made to combat social isolation and break a "digital divide."
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“Aging in place” is a popular concept among seniors these days. A 2018 AARP poll showed 3 in 4 older adults (50+) want to live at home as long as they possibly can. That’s great for people with homes, but what about homeless seniors, or homeowners threatened with foreclosure, or renters facing eviction?
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AARP grants to help, cities, towns, and rural areas make improvements
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